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Stanford Business
Business research, insights, & ideas from Stanford Graduate School of Business.
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Stanford Business Jan 20
Professor Lawrence Wein found that that small, often costless adjustments to the procedure of ballistics analysis could dramatically improve crime-solving capabilities.
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Stanford Business Jan 20
Studies have shown that employee-wellness programs sometimes cost more money than they save.
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Stanford Business Jan 19
“It’s almost always the case that the greatest firms are discovered and not planned.” –Professor William P. Barnett
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Stanford Business Jan 19
Bearing some telltale signs of corporate malpractice, Theranos's story is a reminder that the road to ruin is paved with good intentions.
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Stanford Business Jan 19
"Business etiquette, like much outward behavior, is often driven by 'centuries-old cultural ethos,'” says Lecturer Scotty McLennan.
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Stanford Business Jan 18
"If you don’t create the kind of organization that will correct your errors, you could lead your firm right over a cliff." –Jonathan Bendor
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Stanford Business Jan 18
founder and CEO opened up to Fortuna Admissions about the value of the MBA, "thinking around the corner" as an entrepreneur, and why she believes passion is the critical success factor.
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Stanford Business Jan 18
Two professors help students understand their values and navigate challenges to them.
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Stanford Business Jan 18
A scholar used the circus arts industry to study creative forecasting.
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Stanford Business Jan 17
On creating a top product: “If we don’t listen to the voice of the athlete, we don’t have anything.” –Phil Knight, co-founder & Chairman Emeritus
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Stanford Business Jan 17
If you’re going to be an entrepreneur, it has to be something you’re going to love, because there are going to be some dark days. And we never hesitated in those dark days. –Phil Knight, co-founder & Chairman Emeritus
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Stanford Business Jan 17
Collaborative leadership, in my view, is really the only kind of leadership that will work today. I hope people in this auditorium today realize that hero leadership is not autocratic leadership. Don’t equate hero leadership with autocratic leadership. –Phil Knight
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Stanford Business Jan 17
Our product is our strongest marketing tool, so we’re always working to improve our product. Keeping our product and keeping our advertising fresh is a real challenge. –Phil Knight, co-founder & Chairman Emeritus
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Stanford Business Jan 17
“Nike’s culture is a big part of its success. Nike is young and irreverent, and I’m neither.” –Phil Knight, co-founder & Chairman Emeritus
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Stanford Business Jan 17
“It doesn’t matter how many people hate your brand as long as more people love it.” –Phil Knight, co-founder & Chairman Emeritus
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Stanford Business Jan 17
When you’re an introvert entrepreneur, you have to believe. You have to believe in order to overcome a certain shyness...At the end of the day, you’ve got to believe. –Phil Knight, co-founder & Chairman Emeritus
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Stanford Business Jan 17
We’re live tweeting from this month’s View From The Top event, featuring Phil Knight, co-founder and Chairman Emeritus. Follow along at
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Stanford Business Jan 17
Once employees have taken money off the table, there could be an adverse effect on motivation. It’s a delicate balance. –Professor David F. Larcker
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Stanford Business Jan 17
Nationwide, 19 million current and former government workers are counting on retirement income from public employee pension funds.
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Stanford Business Jan 16
“Uber is an example of a company that started small with a good idea...and grew into a monolith. But along the way, [management] didn’t pay enough attention to how they wanted to do business from a cultural and ethical standpoint.” –Professor David Larcker
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