Twitter | Search | |
Quinn Nelson
I see a lot of people getting irrationally frustrated that the A12Z is just an A12X with an extra GPU core unlocked. This might seem weird those who don't know how manufacturing ICs works, but Apple is doing what literally every silicon manufacturer does. Lemme explain:
Reply Retweet Like More
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
Making integrated circuits is extremely difficult and it's one of the reasons very few companies make them. There are a lot of steps that include things like: wafer production, photolithography, etching, ion implantation, metallization, etc. Apple's are manufactured by TSMC.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
At every point of these many operations, small errors can occur (and do). Often times, these errors ruin the whole wafer. Yield rates are very secretive but it has long been rumored that Intel only has a 60% yield rate (and that's good). i.e. only 60 of every 100 processors work.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
Other (more common) errors result in a chip that performs worse than expected. Rather than toss the whole chip, companies will repurpose them as lower-end chips. e.g. very often Intel i3/i5 processors are i7 that didn't meet expectations and had cores disabled.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @GamersNexus
More recently, the new NVIDIA RTX 2060 KO were discovered by and others to be RTX 2080 dies that were defective and didn't meet spec.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
When production on a new chip begins, it is typical for there to be a lot of small errors with a low overall yield for high-end chips. With time, manufacturers improve on their processes and yields increase.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
Because Apple has the tendency to put the same SoC in all their phones/tablets, rather than throw away the (likely huge) majority that had defects, they made the 7-core GPU chips the "norm" and are now realizing use of the high-binned 8-core GPU chips for the new iPad Pro.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
It's honestly remarkable that this is seemingly the first occurrence of Apple doing this because it's insanely common in the industry. Fun side note: TSMC's yield on the upcoming A14 is rumored to be 80% which is unprecedentedly high. Really impressive.
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 26
Replying to @SnazzyQ
Apple never misrepresented the A12X. It was always sold as an 8-core chip with 7-GPU cores because it *was.* The A12Z is being sold as an 8-core chip with 8-GPU cores because it *is.*
Reply Retweet Like
Quinn Nelson Mar 27
Replying to @JassyTech
I criticize Apple all the time. Where have you been? This just isn’t a place to actually criticize them for anything.
Reply Retweet Like