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Shannon McNamara, MD
Emergency Physician | Medical Simulation | Re-centering our humanity in health care. | pro-Inquiry | anti-Nonsense | she/her 🏳️‍🌈 | Opinions my own.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 9m
Replying to @obxpilot23
Being an ally means recognizing the different between the your experience and everyone else’s. Your experience matters. Mine does, too. They are different.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 10m
Replying to @obxpilot23
I’ve been called a dyke & sexually propositioned more times than I can remember. I also get generally told to f*ck off and physically threatened. There are the issues that hit all of us, then there are the issues that hit women & minorities differently.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 13m
It’s not you.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 13m
Workplace assault and harassment is a huge issue for any person working the the ED. It’s affects women and people of color and LGBTQ people differently when the harassment focuses on those identities.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16m
Ugh. The worst.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16m
Good catch! Those cases can be so hard to pick up amid the high volumes of flu season. I hope he did well.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 19m
Replying to @fyreman2006
There is a threshold that gets crossed to press charges, but the police are often not helpful either. A patient swung to punch a nurse & when we called the police to report it they basically refused to take it & said it wasn’t assault. I backed her up &forced the issue.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16h
Replying to @KellyMDoran
Yes.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16h
Yes. Last shift it was an intoxicated patient yelling “I want a [sexual act]! I want a [sexual act]!” at me. This is pretty much a daily occurrence in my professional practice as a woman in Emergency Medicine. There’s no recourse. We just deal. It’s exhausting.
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Shannon McNamara, MD retweeted
Emily Fridenmaker 17h
This thread is important. As an attending, your job is more than just supervision of patient care. Your residents are more than just cogs in the machine of the hospital, getting the patients in and the notes done. You can see a resident flourish when you invest in her.
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Shannon McNamara, MD retweeted
Shreya P. Trivedi MD 16h
. once asked if there’s one thing i could change about , what would it be? I wish I had said a way to truly medical educators, not something that’s just expected but actually valued & fostered- now HOW to do that is the Q? Thoughts?
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16h
Healthcare loves the aviation industry analogy until you get to the part where pilots unionize and strike over this stuff. They just won’t fly if it’s too unsafe because they’re putting their lives at risk. Why is it different w our patients lives at risk with unsafe staffing?
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16h
Which I imagine would be celebrated as moving volume until a case of myocarditis or occult sepsis gets missed and then suddenly it’s “how could you??” & all their fault. Does anyone know the safest workload & how to measure it?
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Shannon McNamara, MD 16h
Also need to be smart about limits and goals. There are lots of variables. Increased handoffs are dangerous. Low volume critical access areas make an argument for longer shifts and sleep breaks. But decision fatigue & limits of cognitive load are very real. Let’s measure it.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 18h
Ultimately it’s a financial question. How much money does it cost to hire another hospitalist or clinician to make the workload reasonable?
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Shannon McNamara, MD 18h
I hear you on the practicalities that limit speaking up, but also...if it’s not possible, why not say “this patient load is unreasonable and unsafe for one person to carry?”
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Shannon McNamara, MD 19h
Also disagree that hour limits on residents has anything to do with patient safety. I learned that I could fall asleep standing up when signing out on 24 hour call. That’s not safe for patients. Curious how about how you arrived at your alternate views on the topic.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 19h
“I believe every person I encounter, including myself, has the right to their body. When that bodily autonomy is taken away, to me, that is against Christian scripture, and is against the Gospel I believe in.” Thank you for embracing justice, love, humility & nuance.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 20h
I see the personal responsibility to know your limits. Push yourself to operate at your edge. Challenge yourself to grow. And when you hit cognitive fatigue and get dangerous, rather, BEFORE you get dangerous, be aware and ask for help. Create systems to prevent this.
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Shannon McNamara, MD 20h
It worries me when trainees take this on as a personal responsibility to see as many patients as possible. Learning to work efficiently matters, but at some point you hit a wall and need to ask for help. Cognitive load theory proves this. We’re limited. That’s human.
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