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Scott Sonenshein
Prof ; author of Stretch (get a copy: ); Next up: Joy at Work w/ , Spring 2020
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Scott Sonenshein Apr 9
Replying to @SABarclay @UVA and 3 others
Congrats on the terrific round!
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Scott Sonenshein Mar 29
Does this remind anyone of 1999?
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Scott Sonenshein Mar 18
We're looking for the next set of research on the science of doing more with less. Please consider submitting your best work on resourcefulness at work to upcoming special issue in by Jan 2020.
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Scott Sonenshein Feb 14
New research I conducted in collaboration with , , and Madeline Ong shows that sometimes making the moral case works better than the business case. issues
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Scott Sonenshein retweeted
Rice University News Feb 1
's book, “Joy At Work: The Career-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” co-authored with , a professor of management at , is coming up in 2020.
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Scott Sonenshein Jan 17
Some great advice by on ways to break boredom at work. Glad to see stretching make this way...constraints spark our creativity and engagement.
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Scott Sonenshein Jan 8
A great example of stretching by , learning that bigger budget productions don't mean better quality or more successful movies.
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Scott Sonenshein Nov 16
Replying to @JoshuaTempSays
Indeed, some scientists have lost the ability to stretch. Too many resources can be very stifling for innovation. And it would help to have a bunch of outsiders. Many scientific fields are too homogenous and operate in a silo.
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Scott Sonenshein Nov 15
Organizations are fundamentally storytellers. Some insights from my latest research courtesy of
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Scott Sonenshein Nov 11
., congrats on $8B sale to ! You didn’t raise venture funding for first decade, and used revenues to grow while staying lean. CEO “Working with limited resources compels focus and fine-tunes problem solving.”
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Scott Sonenshein Nov 10
Replying to @MicheleWilliamz
Big budgets often hamper creativity. There’s a reason why big tech companies like to buy smaller, and more resource constrained, startups. Their creativity disappeared with their resource abundance.
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Scott Sonenshein Oct 22
Great to see Stretch quoted in piece about helping people persevere through difficult and turn constraints into opportunities.
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Scott Sonenshein Oct 5
Latest victim of chasing: , which chased market share and put multiple locations on the same block.
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Scott Sonenshein Oct 4
More selection is not always better for . is latest to struggle because they're still operating how they did decades before. Their stores need to be decluttered, and so do their business practices.
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Scott Sonenshein Oct 3
When companies chase unsustainable business models, they use whatever it takes to keep feeding their resource appetite. 's decision to start charging former customers w/cancelled subscriptions unless they opt-out is very unethical
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Scott Sonenshein Oct 1
Signs of a bubble? Is it a party like 1999?
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Scott Sonenshein Sep 24
There's a lot of very resourceful companies on this list!
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Scott Sonenshein Sep 12
. offers some good thoughts on why the future will bring shorter work weeks, more productivity and greater joy for workers. The real challenge will be if business leaders are stuck in the past and not adapt. 
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Scott Sonenshein Sep 4
Good lessons from actor & 's employee :"There is no job that's better than another...It might pay better... have better benefits...look better on a resume..but actually it's not better. Every job is worthwhile & valuable"
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Scott Sonenshein Aug 30
As consumers care more about the environment, businesses must be in meeting needs of customers and . Some thoughts I gave to about and need to turn a ban into an opportunity.
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