Twitter | Search | |
Sara Scanga
Professor | 4-4 teaching, dept chair | plant ecology research, beekeeping, gardening | PhD ‘09 | BA ‘97
2,694
Tweets
376
Following
365
Followers
Tweets
Sara Scanga 1h
Excellent animation!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @UCBiology
Dr. Dameshek's research agenda , students encouraged to get involved! 1-N cycling microbes/rates in CNY rivers & lakes. 2-Characterize 2 novel thaumarchaeal isolates. 3-Aquatic metagenomics/transcriptomics. 4-Antibiotic resistance gene abundances/source tracking.
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
How abundant are Nitrosotenuis-like Thaumarchaeota in the Amazon? --Thaumarchaeota, mostly *Nitrosotenuis*, highly transcriptionally active and abundant in the Amazon!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Lots of good open source 'omics software available out there. Relatively easy to learn, don't be scared off! Example: Anvi'o (Eren et al. 2015 in PeerJ). Great website tutorials and blogs at ! Can download their data and walk through step by step!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
4) sequence everything! So use 'omics, throw as much $$ at it as you have, get millions/billions of short sequences per experiment! Example: DNA --> metagenome (what genes/microbes are present); goal is to pull composite "genomes" out of metagenomes.
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Ways to study microbial ecology: 1) biogeochemistry (what do microbes do?); 2) cultures in the lab (specifics of how one microbe spp works, but only if you know how to grow it in lab); 3) PCR relevant gene(s) & quantify/sequence (great way to look at specific genes, but biased
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
So why are there so many Thaumarcheaota in these eutrophic freshwater environments when they are typically thought of as being adapted to *oligotrophic* environments??
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Statinsky et al. 2017 Frontiers in Marine Science: Lots of active Thaumarchaeota in the Amazon River (very eutrophic)! AND, Sacramento River (eutrophic) from Damashek dissertation: also lots. Hampel et al. 2018 in Lake Taihu (eutrophic): also lots!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Amazon River, ~20% of global river discharge (>next 8 largest combined!). Huge source of C, nutrients to Atlantic Ocean!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
N cycling = microbial activity! Microbes rule the WORLDDDDDD. And Ammonia oxidizers are THE LINK between N inputs and outputs in an ecosystem!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Dr. Dameshek covers all the ways humans mess with the global N cycle! How about coastal N cycle? N enrichment = higher productivity, which can have positive/negative changes on the rest of the food web. More N, more phytos, more fish🙂 OR More N, more phytos, more anoxia🙁
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
We cover the paradox of N. Atmosphere is ~80% N gas, but that triple bond between N-N is tough to break! So N limits productivity in many environments, including in coastal/marine environments.
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Now we focus on Thaumarchaeota, high affinity for ammonium and oxygen. Small cells, grow slowly, small streamlined genomes. So Thaumarchaeota can compete very effectively for N in deep ocean (grow and die slowly)!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
In soil and ocean, Crenarchaea have amo genes (ammonia oxidation genes). These ocean dwellers fix CO2 and also are ammonia-oxidizing autotrophs.
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Pelagic Crenarchaeota are 20% of all microbial cells in the world ocean (Karner et al. 2001)!!
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Replying to @SaraScanga
Archaea first appeared in literature in 1977, classic paper by Woese and Fox. Changed our understanding of biology! Crenarchaeota (clade of Archaea) are extremophiles that are abundant in deep ocean.
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Welp, I lost most of the tweets of the super interesting Intro because Twitter crashed.
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
Live tweeting a Asa Gray seminar by ! Title: Using publicly-available 'omics data to unravel the ecology of freshwater archaea
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga Oct 21
I'm going to be live tweeting a Asa Gray seminar by in an hour! Title: Using publicly-available 'omics data to unravel the ecology of freshwater archaea
Reply Retweet Like
Sara Scanga retweeted
Nelson! Oct 21
I'm going to be leading a lab meeting in a couple of weeks, so if anyone has strong opinions on some short articles to compel my advisor and peers to read about how we can approach diversity, inclusion, and marginalization in academia, I'd love to hear them!
Reply Retweet Like