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Sam Hartburn
I will take a moment to bask in the glory of winning the Best Maths in a Cake competition with Diagonal Cross Sections of a Level-2 Menger Sponge.
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Sam Hartburn 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
Here are some work-in-progress photos for anyone who is interested
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Sam Hartburn 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
When I got home, some of the off cuts had been put into a chocolate trifle. I won't post photos, because it looks like type 6 on @ajk_44's chart. But it tastes amazing.
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Sam Hartburn 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
There are lots of off cuts left. If you're near Whitstable and you want some cake, come and see me.
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Sue Browning πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡Ί 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
I have no idea what that is, but it looks fab. Congratulations, Sam.
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Sam Hartburn 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SueBrowning_ed
You make a Menger sponge by taking a cube and cutting holes through the middle, then cutting smaller holes through the smaller cubes that are left, and so on. I like the fact that if you cut something made from cubes in a certain way you get triangles, hexagons and stars.
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Dr Eugenia Cheng 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
Omg how nervous were you when taking the cross sections? How much does it depend on cutting accuracy?
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Sam Hartburn 13 Nov 17
Replying to @DrEugeniaCheng
When I made the first cut I was actually shaking. To get the star you have to cut in the right place and at the right angle. The other cuts were easier as they were parallel to the first, and I think would look good wherever you cut it.
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Aarefa Johari 14 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
Genuine question from a math-challenged lady: What is the purpose/use of a Menger sponge? I tried googling it but only found definitions of it. (Your cake is jaw-dropping, btw!)
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𝑺𝒂𝒓𝒂𝒉 π‘―π’†π’‘π’‰π’”π’Šπ’ƒπ’‚ 14 Nov 17
It is useful as a "pathological" example. When a mathematician is checking a piece of mathematics, this kind of thing is used to see if it still makes sense when things get really wierd.
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Dominika Vasilkova 13 Nov 17
Replying to @SamHartburn
It was my favourite one out of all the cakes this year!
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Sam Hartburn 13 Nov 17
Replying to @Dragon_Dodo
Thank you!
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