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Ahmad Al-Jallad
The inscription KRS 1131 contains a unique invocation: ḫaraṣa ʾahl-oh ḥāṣ́era fa-hā-ʾAḤAD wal-lāt salām le-ḏī daʿaya 'he kept watch for his family while camping near water so O ʾAḥad and Allāt, may he who reads (this) have security and spoil'
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 20 May 18
Replying to @Safaitic
This is the only occurrence of the god name ʾaḥad, literally 'One'. The term is used in the the Shema (שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָֽד) Duet. 6:4. It is possible that the Safaitic nomads were invoking the God of Israel in this inscription, referring (cont.)
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 20 May 18
Replying to @Safaitic
to him as 'the one god'. Ironically, while the Shema is the essence of Jewish monotheism, the polytheistic nomads invoked ʾaḥad, 'the one god', besides Allāt, the famous ancient Arabian goddess --a beautiful example of religious syncretism in the ancient world!
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May Shaddel 20 May 18
Replying to @Safaitic
Is this inscription published, Ahmad?
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 20 May 18
Replying to @MayShaddel
This inscription is published on Ociana, but this is my interpretation, published in my outline grammar. The reading is certain. I have a colleague who disagrees because he isn't convinced that one could invoke "ahad" with other gods. But that's the point !
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Abaan Mio 20 May 18
Replying to @Safaitic
To when is it dated? When reading your transcription, it seems like really close to arabic!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 20 May 18
Replying to @abaanmiodrag2
It is undated but roughly at the turn of the Era, so about 2000 years ago. Indeed, the language of the Safaitic inscriptions is Old Arabic.
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داير اكورك بس ما عندي خشم 22 May 18
Replying to @Safaitic
اهلاً! هل في عندك نسخة عربية من النصوص؟ على الاقل مكتوبة لانو الاحرف اللاتينية ما تساعد في الإحاء ابدا!!!! و شكراً 🌹
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