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Ahmad Al-Jallad
Dagon in Arabia: for the last few years I have been working on a group of inscriptions called Thamudic C, found in central and north Arabia. One sub-group contains invocations to a god called <dgn>, who must be related to the Syrian god Dagon.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
Winnett and Reed in 1973 published this txt, found near Ha'il in Saudi Arabia. Their reading and translation was incorrect, as the sound values of this form of Thamudic C were not yet understood. They offered this translation: O Dṯn, I have a disease (?). By Hutaim for Tais.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
These types of non-nonsensical translations are common for the Thamudic inscriptions, as they have for the most part remained undeciphered. But after looking at hundreds of Thamudic C texts, we can come to a better understanding of its script and language.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
I suggest this reading and trans: h dgn l-yd h-ʾlht mlt-s 'O Dagon, may his people be in the company of the gods'. These texts provide our first evidence of the worship of the Syro-Mesopotamian fertility god in Arabia. Let us go over some of its linguistic details:
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
l-yd: this is the preposition /li-/ and the word for hand /yad/. The same form exists in Aramaic, meaning 'next to'. ʾlht: is probably /ʾālihat/ 'gods', plural of ʾilāh. Finally, mlt-s is /millat/ 'people' (Arabic millah) and the pronoun /-su/ 'his', Akk. šū, Minaic sw, etc.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
What is especially intriguing about Thamudic C is that we have no idea how old these inscriptions are. Not a single one is dated and they do not co-occur with any other scripts. These texts could stretch back to the early first millennium BCE and perhaps even earlier.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
Whenever they were produced, they attest to a lost Semitic language that was spoken/written in Central Arabia -- the mythological heartland of Arabic -- sometime before the rise of Islam. The publication on my treatment of Thamudic C should appear next year so stay tuned!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
Incidentally, these new Thamudic C and D inscriptions from near Yathrib/Madina have just been posted online.
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Ahmar Saeed 🇮🇳 5 Jul 18
Replying to @Safaitic
I seriously read it as 'Dragon'.
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Devyn Jayse 5 Jul 18
Replying to @AhmarSaeed1 @Safaitic
I was like, “What has a merman got to do with dragons?”
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التوراة الحجازية 5 Jul 18
Truly this an Arabian not a Syrian God.The worshippers of Dagon were in Milkan valley west of Taif , and the دعجان today are their descendants.
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leila 5 Jul 18
there is a beit dajan village in palestine (destroyed in 1948) that was mentioned in ancient egyptian & assyrian text as beit dagana ... there is also a dajani family & dagon was worshipped by canaanites & philistines
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