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Ahmad Al-Jallad
Epigraphist | Philologist | Historian of Language || Ancient Near East and Pre-Islamic Arabia.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 8h
Replying to @ymiller419 @jae_heehan
Here is the draft : . I am adding a section on the possibility of “pagan” monotheism as well, εις θεός.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 8h
Replying to @ymiller419 @jae_heehan
Fascinating! Well, it doesn’t seem so but there were ties with the Herodian rulers of the Hawran. One inscription states that a Safaitic author pastured as far as <yrslm> that is Jerusalem. I’ve collected the evidence in a draft article that I need to update and publish.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 8h
Replying to @jae_heehan @ymiller419
Sorry remove the final ه , typo!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 8h
Replying to @jae_heehan @ymiller419
Indeed, the root حـ سـ م ه is productive in the Arabic onomasticon, e.g. husām, etc. Macdonald in his edition of this text suggested it is a prepositional name ka-hesmān “like Hesmān”. Could be!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad retweeted
Hythem Sidky 9h
The excessive positivism on Twitter lately would lead us to conclude that the Biblical King Saul (Ṭālūt) himself made a pit stop at the outskirts of Medina to leave us this nice inscription.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Oldfrankishphil
Thank you, my friend!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Oldfrankishphil
Is the pre-print paper available somewhere for the public? The price tag on the article is outrageous!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
It was documented correctly and studied and scrutinized by the best Arabian epigraphists. It was documented before the rush of social media interest in Islamic-period inscriptions as well.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @PhDniX @mattcrotts
If they check out paleographically. Once again we need systematic and scientific documentation of this material.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @PhDniX @mattcrotts
I think we need to be a bit careful about absolute statements like this. Forgers may not understand paleography but there are lots of examples of old texts to imitate. There isn’t a reason to doubt this text, I think, but we should still be skeptical of finds like these even ...
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @ibn_layla
Masculine names that end in -at but have undergone the at>ah sound change are hellenized as first declension masculine a-stems, So ‘obodah < ‘obodat yields Οβοδας, Οβοδου.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @ibn_layla
But masculine names terminating in -at remained 2nd declension masculine, so you can have names like حارثة as Αρεταθος. Hellenization depends on the natural gender of the referent and not on the name’s morphological gender.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @ibn_layla
Usually as 1st declension feminine long a-stems. I recall the name of a woman from Umm al-Jimal Μορεαθη /morei’at/, dim. of mar’at “woman”. I’ll get the reference when I’m at my computer later today. No Greek inscriptions by women in the Harrah are known though.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @SBA1948
The tetraskelion is the letter /t/ in the Safaitic square script. It is the final letter of the name /bannat/ in this inscription.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @mattcrotts
These types of judgements are not easily made from photographs. But nothing else about the inscription is suspect - the paleography and orthography are good for the period. I wouldn’t dismiss it.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Safaitic
Bibliography: Photo: MCA Macdonald via OCIANA Text is published in: Macdonald, M.C.A., Al Muʾazzin, M. & Nehmé, L. Les inscriptions safaïtiques de Syrie, cent quarante ans après leur découverte. Comptes rendus des séances de l'Académie des Inscriptions & Belles-Lettres 1996.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Safaitic
Ḍād ض is rendered with Sigma in the pre-Islamic Arabic of the southern Levant suggesting it was voiceless and certainly not a plosive or interdental. On its pronunciation and rendering Arabic in Greek in this period, see:
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Safaitic
Arabic names ending in *ay (ى) are Hellenized as masculine -es nouns, cf. Σωκράτης. Αβδουσαρης = Abd-ḏū-śarē 'worshipper of Dusares'.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Safaitic
Addenda: Most Arabic masculine names were Hellenized in the second declension, so Taym became Θαιμος /Taimos/. But if the name ended in a vowel or a laryngeal following a, then the first declension was used: Wahballāh became Ουαβαλλας /wahballās/.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 16
Replying to @Safaitic
So, for fun, how would we render the name of King Abdullah II of Jordan? Answer: Αβδαλλας Αλοσεινου Κοραισηνος φυλὴς Ασεμηνῶν Abdallās Aloseinou Koraisēnos phulēs А̄semēnōn
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