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Ahmad Al-Jallad
Epigraphist | Philologist | Historian of Language || Ancient Near East and Pre-Islamic Arabia.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 1h
Replying to @GabrielSaidR
It occurs occasionally, also spellings like ولقوه for wa-l-quwwah “and might”. Many variations in Arabic orthography in this early period.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 1h
Replying to @ceci_pal_
Paleography; orthography; formularies; language. Could conceivably be early 7th c but pre-Islamic.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 1h
Replying to @bareem11
We can’t know exactly which shade of meaning of this root was intended - I liked bravery but aid is equally possible!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 1h
Replying to @bareem11
The letter really looks like a ـعـ but perhaps it is poorly executed. The most straightforward reading from the picture is العره but perhaps clearer photos will support an س reading.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 6h
Replying to @shahanSean
Thanks! I was looking for this thread; very helpful.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 15h
Replying to @Safaitic
Ps: there seems to be a cross above the inscription, suggesting that its author may have been Christian. Another text from the same era is carved to the left of the one I read as well.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @bareem11
These r preliminary & humble remarks quickly typed — I’ll update if new ideas come; please feel free to make suggestions Some comparanda: ... لبني عوض سلم انتم فلا اوصكم ببر ىله ولقوه ولرمح ولخيل وقتل القوم وىقا الرحم وكرمت الضيف Thank you for bringing this to my attn!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
tentative reading: انا ثـٰبت بن ...ىـن لبني الخزرج سلم انتم فلا اوصكم ببر ىله واطعـٰم اضّيف وقتـٰل العـ(د)[و] وحمل الغز ٰة والنجد وحيـٰكم ربّكم (و)الّه خير ذا
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
If the word العره is correctly identified as ġazāh then it suggests a diff pronunciation than the QCT, which would have produced غزوه, ġazōh.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
Orthographic notes: The definite article is written phonetically, with the assimilation of the lām: اضيف "aḍ-ḍayf”. This is the first inscription to record the alternation between اله and ىله for “god”. The second و of the last line is poorly executed but can be nothing else.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
وحيكم ربكم <و> اله خير ذا “And may your lord preserve you for Allāh is the best of this (I.e. preservers). The final words are very lightly scratched and the interpretation tentative. The expression is new but reminiscent of Qur’anic formula - الله خير + (اسم).
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
But this reconstruction is supported by a parallel expression in another text, قتل القوم. وحمل الغزة والنجد “And to carry out raids and bravery” If the reading العره is correct and identified as غراة, it would suggest a different phonology than the QCT. We’ll come back to this.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
The spelling of “god” here as ىله in construct suggests a pronunciation illāh in this context. We have seen this spelling before in several other texts from the region. واطعم اضيف وقتل الع(د)[و] And to feed the guest and fight (the enemy). The final word is cut off..
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
The second line ends with the greeting سلم انتم “may you be secure”, common in the 6th c inscriptions of this region and apparently recorded in Islamic-period literary sources. Now for the meat and potatoes: فلا اوصكم ببر ىله “And so I urge you to be devoted to God”
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
Replying to @Safaitic
The text is difficult to read because later folks have etched their names and wusūm over the first few lines. انا ثـٰبت بر ...ىـن لبني الخزرج سلم انتم “I am Thabit ... of the Bani Khazraj؛ may you be secure”
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 16h
We interrupt this Thanksgiving weekend for yet another important discovery - a new 6th c. CE Arabic inscription from the Tabuk area, monotheistic and containing new expressions and formularies. Let’s see!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad retweeted
Paul Sedra Nov 24
Christian Arabic Bible Translations in the British Library Collections
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 25
The “l” at the end is a typo, just says: 𐩱𐩥𐩺𐩪. It is good practice (and useful for the reader as well) to indicate where one obtains the image and where the object is currently kept.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 24
Replying to @Safaitic
commentary: naṣaba = 'he erected a cult stone', a ritual act attested frequently in Safaitic. kamāś = Arabicized form of Kemosh, Moabite 𐤊𐤌𐤔; an invocation to this deity seems appropriate considering Moab is a place in Utah. nagawat = deliverance, QCT نجوه boʾs = 'evil'.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 24
Where is the associated Safaitic inscription?! Would probably say: wa-naṣaba pʰa-hā-kamās nagawat meb-boʾs!
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