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Tristan Moody
This battery charger spent almost nineteen years on the P6 truss segment of , making it (to my knowledge) the longest flown piece of hardware ever returned from space. Each colored flag points to a meteoroid or orbital debris strike we found on inspection.
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Kyle Feb 15
The face towards the camera only has one flag on it. I wonder if the top face was orthogonal to direction of travel.
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Tristan Moody Feb 15
The sides of the box were somewhat shadowed by neighboring hardware and weren't all that exposed
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John R. - Astronomy & rocket launch reporter Feb 15
I wonder what the ratio of meteroid/orbital debris the damage is?
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Chris Ostrom Feb 15
I believe the latest estimate is something like 10:1 OD:MM for low Earth orbit
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Olivier Lamarre Feb 14
Wow! Any chance you could post a close-up picture of one of these holes? And can you retrieve the said meteoroid/debris, or do they usually disintegrate upon impact?
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Tristan Moody Feb 14
This is one of the biggest. The incoming particles usually more or less vaporize on impact.
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Randall Smith Feb 15
Finally a picture of true TRL9 equipment!
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Tristan Moody Feb 15
Imagine your cell phone charger lasting this long
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Fraser "Staying Home" Cain Feb 15
Incredible picture, shows how many pieces of orbital debris are out there.
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Tristan Moody Feb 15
Replying to @fcain @Space_Station
The interesting thing is we were all surprised at how few strikes we saw. We were predicting a lot more
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