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Stephanie Lawton
Ph.D cand. working on 19th c. US history, presidents, funerals, classics; intern & , former fellow, creator of
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
that's really intriguing. And good for them.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
Yeah, I think that's part of it. Also partly trying to prove that they aren't mentally inferior or ungenteel as had been argued. But that also set up difficult dynamic for African Americans studying classics. Initially, might have been done to conform to white cultural standards
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
look into genre of literary/historical known as "classica africana"
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
good question. Entirely possible that enslaved start using Greco-Roman names as familial names. But also, realizing the ways that white "ownership" of classical knowledge is being used to deny humanity/citizenship, freed black/enslaved indvds start studying when possible
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
I agree, don't think you can say American until at earliest shortly before 1776, and even then, arguably there is no American national identity until way later in 19th. American colonists only reject the claim to English identity quite late, and some never do, hence loyalists.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
5/imposing a non-familial name on their slave against wishes of his own family and African, african creole culture. But maybe also power for the slave who realizes what his/her name means.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
4/I've often wondered it this might produce unintended effect. If a slave learned he was named after famous Roman or Greek conqueror, how did this effect his view of his own power? Did it make him more resistant? And of course, there is power in names. Power for the person
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
oops, Colonial/Roman slavery at that point, not US. Dates friends, dates, so troublesome
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
3/upon a power play. Demonstration that slaveowners are the educated ones, not slaves, and that they are powerful enough to "own" and control a "Caesar, a Pompey, a Cato." as their slave. A really stupid, nostalgic fantasy of themselves as powerful Romans. But these are theories
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
2/I believe there are some other scholars working on this particular practice. In 18th C. don't think it has anything to do w/republican mythmaking. Possible as connection between US/Roman slavery. Definitely based upon obsession w/classics among slaveowning class. Suspect based
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 5
Pt 1) American identity development - I don't think an "American identity" emerges until late in 18th C at the earliest, but I think there is a separate "Colonial" identity that does develop earlier. 2)I don't have full explanation for Greco-Roman names for slaves. 1/2
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Sarah Adler Dec 5
25yo Emily returns to her small-but-famous hometown of Gettysburg after her father’s death. When she falls for the charming Civil War historian who hires her as his research assistant she must confront the grief & love standing between her & the future she wants.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 4
Replying to @SKayLawton
I'm relieved that Harvard turned me down, because they said they only offered a competitive funding package to other programs, probably about $20-25k stipend, pre-tax. That is not a livable wage in Boston, but it's just livable in central virginia.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 4
Replying to @SKayLawton
When workers aren't paid an equitable wage for the area in which they are employed, it means that businesses/institutions are underfunding them and that other taxpayers or lenders have to subsidize the eventual, inevitable, shortfall.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 4
Replying to @SKayLawton
All workers need to be paid a livable wage for the area in which they work and 1 that takes into account the amount of hours they're expected to work, their experience & their skills. So grad students in Boston might have claim to higher salary than ambulance driver in South Utah
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 4
I agree that first responders/ nurses/ etc. are paid way too little for their work, but that sort of fallacious logic isn't a good reason to keep other workers impoverished. This sort of financial inequity should be addressed wherever it occurs, including at an elite Ivy school
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Stephanie Lawton retweeted
Roopika Risam Dec 4
This week on , your hosts & I, talk with about mental health in the academy. Give it a listen, hear about Katie's inspiring story, and learn more about where we're going wrong and who's starting to get it right.
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 4
have some situations were I could use thiss
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Stephanie Lawton retweeted
Cherylee Houston Dec 4
Does anyone have the link to how you plan accessible journeys in London using public transport? I’m not being very successful at googling..
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Stephanie Lawton Dec 4
It was a very helpful event. Learned some new things, which I always love.
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