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SHEG
Stanford History Education Group Charting the future of teaching the past.
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SHEG retweeted
Josh Blanchfield 7h
Snapshot Autobiography share out!
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SHEG Sep 17
Why did senators oppose joining the League of Nations in 1919? In our newest lesson, students examine speeches delivered by various senators to answer this question.
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Glenn Wiebe Sep 17
The latest Sam Wineburg book is out! "Why Learn History? (When It’s Already On Your Phone?)" Quick review at .
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Mrs. Ebinger Sep 13
Juniors were today, deciphering and papers from . History/Government teachers should check out their lessons using primary documents. 🇺🇸📝📚📃🇺🇸
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SHEG Sep 12
Read our latest research on history assessments in Cognition and Instruction:
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Stephen Sawchuk Sep 11
Still looking for teachers that use the Reading Like a Historian resources - EdWeek wants to follow up with you! ssawchuk@epe.org
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Sam Wineburg Sep 6
Thanks to & 's terrific editor, Michael Simpson, for making our latest article on civic online reasoning open access & free to any teacher who wants to read it.
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SHEG Sep 6
Measure students' ability to use evidence from disparate accounts to support the same historical argument with our new assessment, featuring documents on the Siege of Vicksburg:
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SHEG Sep 5
Read our latest article in Social Education for strategies to help students avoid common online pitfalls:
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Sam Wineburg Sep 4
Formative assessment in the college history classroom,
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jkrnich Sep 4
World History students interview each other about their Snapshot Autobiographies, my favorite start-of-year activity...by the end of this they will have had a personal conversation with every member of our class 👍🏼🗣🌎
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SHEG Aug 30
Can students identify who's behind a website? In this digital assessment, students determine whether a website is a trustworthy source to learn about children's health.
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SHEG Aug 28
Gauge students' ability to reason about how two documents support the historical argument that the United Farm Workers was an influential labor union with our new assessment:
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SHEG Aug 24
Replying to @yellmm
Thank you!
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SHEG Aug 23
Measure student’s ability to evaluate a sponsored content post and a news article with our new civic online reasoning assessment:
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SHEG Aug 23
High-res PDFs are available for free on our site ( ) and then you can get poster-sized versions made at any print shop (e.g., Staples, Kinkos, etc.). We've also had good experiences with . Unfortunately, we don't have any hard copies
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SHEG Aug 22
You're welcome! Hope the year gets off to a good start!
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RaeLynne Snyder Aug 22
Look at these beautiful posters! Social Studies is working hard on Historical Thinking Skills and learning to Think Like a Historian! No more memorizing facts. Students become investigators of the past.
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Andrew J. Canle Aug 22
I love the new civic online reasoning curriculum has created. The thinking behind it is critical for our students to adopt!
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SHEG Aug 20
We're looking for high school teachers to pilot our new civic online reasoning assessments! If you're willing to help and will have some time by September 7th, please email us at sheg@gse.stanford.edu.
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