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Stanford History Education Group Charting the future of teaching the past.
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Sam Wineburg 16h
Watch the incomparable explain how Wikipedia & Lateral Reading go together in this video developed with the help of & with the Institute. 6/7
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SHEG Feb 12
Not all evidence is created equal. Check out the latest episode of Crash Course Navigating Digital Information for tips on identifying solid evidence! In partnership with and hosted by :
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Rob McEntarffer Feb 12
Social studies, librarians, and anyone interested in helping people think about online sources: please watch this video right now! (thanks !)
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Shawn Healy Feb 12
The is proud to support Sam Wineburg and work to develop across the curriculum. Sam’s op-ed in USA Today speaks to the urgency of this work, elevating it to a matter of national security
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SHEG Feb 11
Can students draw connections between the California Gold Rush and the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882? Our Transcontinental Railroad assessment:
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CrashCourse Feb 6
Probably everyone you've ever met has told you not to use Wikipedia because it's unreliable. What if we told you it can actually be a helpful resource? In collaboration with , John explains how:
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SHEG Jan 29
Check out the latest episode of Crash Course Navigating Digital Information!
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Sam Wineburg Jan 28
Watch explain 's answer to not getting duped on the Internet and forwarding fake stuff on . . ., you guessed it, Twitter. does "lateral reading"
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CrashCourse Jan 22
Reading laterally is a great way to fact check in real time! In collaboration with , explains how to utilize those browser tabs effectively:
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Pedagogues Tekhnoethicasaurus💡 Jan 20
This Navigating Digital Information -- made in partnership with -- should be a great resource for teaching . Preview:
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SHEG Jan 16
Check out episode #2 of Crash Course Navigating Digital Information for some tips on fact checking like a pro! In partnership with and hosted by :
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TRSE Jan 16
After reading our #4 article, check out the episode featuring Sarah McGrew talking about civic online reasoning
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TRSE Jan 16
At #4 in our countdown of most downloaded articles of 2018 is "Can Students Evaluate Online Sources? Learning from Assessments of Civic Online Reasoning" by Sarah McGrew, , Teresa Ortega, Mark Smith, &
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SHEG Jan 11
Support students' sourcing, corroboration and close reading with our newest history lesson on the Portola Expedition:
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SHEG Jan 9
Replying to @HSS_Capo
You're welcome!
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CrashCourse Jan 8
The first episode of Crash Course Navigating Digital Information is here, in collaboration with and hosted by ! 1 in 4 U.S. adults say they are online almost constantly. Let's learn how to navigate this world.
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SHEG Jan 7
Replying to @FussMr
Thanks! Glad you've found our materials useful!
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CrashCourse Dec 18
Introducing Crash Course Navigating Digital Information! Hosted by and created in partnership with , , and , this series will tackle how to be smart consumers of information online.
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SHEG Dec 18
How to think like a fact checker from and Sarah McGrew:
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SHEG Dec 17
Replying to @maggols
In our SACs, students are assigned to a side and must present evidence that supports that side (regardless of their personal beliefs).
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