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The Nat
Explore the natural history of Southern California and Baja California—from past to present—at The Nat.
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The Nat Nov 25
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The Nat Nov 25
If you'd like to binge watch something tomorrow, we have at least 24 discussions, talks, and lectures for you on . We're into it, obviously. .
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The Nat Nov 25
So we're thinking it's a cockroach egg parasitoid, ensign wasp family (Evania appendigaster). This might sound a little gross, but it is an interesting insect! You can read more about it here.
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The Nat Nov 24
Our annual report is live! See what we've accomplished with your support during FY 2019-2020. We think you'll find it...ribbiting. 🐸
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Climate Science Alliance Nov 17
No se pierdan la charla sobre la etnobotánica kumiai de nuestros colegas del Nat () el miércoles 2 de diciembre a las 6PM! 🌱 Regístrense aquí:
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The Nat Nov 24
Thanks for sharing! Will send this over to our entomologists. 😀
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American Alliance of Museums Nov 23
As many museums face the difficult decisions of whether to reclose and when to reopen, read how the decided to "keep the Museum closed and focus on actions online and in nature" for the rest of the year:
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Ashley W Poust Nov 19
Welcome to ! This guessing game gives you emoji and you get to guess the paleontology word or phrase. Today it's an extinct animal... 🔬🦅 Please share and throw your hints and brags in the comments!
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The Nat Nov 17
Replying to @museumofus
Michael is a citizen of the Campo Kumeyaay Nation who has written and published several works on Kumeyaay history and resource management. He's also curated exhibits for the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., and the .
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The Nat Nov 17
Pleased to host Michael Connolly Miskwish for a Wednesday 11/18 at 6 PM. Join this discussion on the ecological relationship with the land. Topics will include agriculture, fire science, hydrological enhancement, and materials science.
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Nick Mason Nov 13
Excited to share new paper on isotopic shifts in Horned Larks alongside the rise of agriculture in the Imperial Valley of California. Thanks to collaborators Phil Unitt and Jed Sparks
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The Nat Nov 17
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Climate Science Alliance Nov 13
Next Wednesday, Nov 18 at 6 PM, is hosting the Nat Talk: e'Muht Mohay–Love of the Land. Michael Connolly Miskwish will discuss the Kumeyaay relationship with the land and the ecological relationship of traditional Kumeyaay practices. Register today!
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The Nat Nov 6
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The Nat Nov 6
A little reading to take you in to what's shaping up to be a rainy weekend, . 🐸 Part 1 in a short blog series focused on protecting the endangered California red-legged frog from extinction.
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The Nat Nov 3
For the love of nature, vote. Island fox at play, Santa Rosa Island.
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The Nat Oct 30
🦇Are bats blind?🦇 Do they all drink blood? Time to bust some common batty misconceptions with help from our very own Batman and wildlife biologist, Drew Stokes.
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The Nat Oct 27
You helped us find a new invasive plant. covered the power of through the app and spoke with our curators about how iNaturalist observations are helping power our conservation and research efforts.
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San Diego STEM Ecosystem Oct 27
Go tide pooling with at on November 20!🦀🐌🦪🐚The event will be live streamed, and a digital resource packet is included with registration. Find out more:
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The Nat Oct 26
News! 🦴 A team of scientists, including 's , identified a 50 million yr old thought to be the oldest record of truly giant flying birds. (Check the 'teeth'!)
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