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Rosemary Mosco
Hey! Things are stressful. Let’s go on a little nature walk.
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Ooh! This leaf fell from a Norway maple tree. You’ll find this European/Asian tree in North American cities, because it LOOKS like our sugar maple but it tolerates pollution and drought well. That black spot? It’s called a Tar Spot and is caused by a harmless fungus.
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Don’t let your cows near this one. If they eat it, their milk will be toxic. That’s how Lincoln’s mother died! It’s White Snakeroot, the most metal of autumn flowers
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Asiatic Dayflower. This plant’s ancestors were imported from Asia for gardens, and they’re now found throughout cities, thriving in the tiniest sidewalk cracks. Each flower lasts for just one day. So, today is your lucky day.
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Courtney Haynes Oct 5
Once, around 1956 in Pittsburgh PA, I saw a lavender blooming (yes, light purple) dayflower. I've never seen another one in my life. I always wondered about whether this was a known thing, or a mutant.
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Liz Ghiselin Stein Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
I don’t want to add to your stress, but Norway maples are terrible trees, invasive af and harmful to the ecosystem of the forest, since they leaf out too soon for wildflowers to grow underneath, and they suck up all the water anyway. Please don’t plant them!
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Heck yeah Pokeweed! People often assume it’s non-native because it does so well in cities, but sorry, suckers, this beauty is NATIVE. It’s poisonous- don’t eat it. Supporters of President James K Polk would wear a sprig of it in their lapel....Ah the halcyon days of plant punning
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @litknitgrit
Yes I am totally aware! Do not plant!
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Huh!
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Many of the plants that come from Europe grow low to the ground. It helped keep them away from the nippy teeth of hungry sheep, and now helps them keep a low profile in cities.
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Tina Rubin Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
We made “ink” from pokeweed berries when I was a kid.
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Alisa Harris Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
This was delightful and confirmed my googling of several plants I was unsure of last week. Had a giant poke berry plant trying to grow behind the shrubs in our yard.
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Dr. Emily Rollinson Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
And there's white goo (latex) in the leaf stalk of Norway maple, but not in sugar maple!
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Okay, one more, then back to work! I’m standing under a huge Silver Maple. This tree is native to flood plains, and now found on some streets. The fallen branch shows the silvery underside of the leaves 😍 Up close, the bark is a total wonderland of lichens, mosses, fungi, ants.
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Hope you enjoyed this walk. Every plant has a cool story. If you need a break, go outside and make some friends who don’t talk much or move much and may poison you, but never on purpose.
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @ejrollinson
Yes! It’s a good recognition technique!
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @CookingUpComics
FYI I’m always happy to ID plants if needed!
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @teageeare
Nice!
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Kathryn Christopher Oct 5
Replying to @RosemaryMosco
Stuck in my cubicle today... I *so* needed this. Thank you! 😊
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Rosemary Mosco Oct 5
Replying to @k_a_christopher
❤️
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