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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD
Physician Scientist, Biotech Entrepreneur, alumnus, Resident, Blog: . Opinions are my own, do not represent medical advice.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD retweeted
Matthew Herper 11h
This morning, we're releasing a look at all the clinical trials against . One big conclusion: we've spent a lot of resources on , probably too much. You see that Jupiter-sized orb towering above all those other planets?
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 5
Replying to @sabraklein1998
The majority plasma for transfusion in general is from males. There is a risk for transfusion associated lung injury (TRALI) from plasma from females, who can have anti-HLA antibodies from pregnancies. This policy is to save lives. More information here:
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 5
Replying to @angie_rasmussen
The majority plasma for transfusion in general is from males. There is a risk for transfusion associated lung injury (TRALI) from plasma from females, who can have anti-HLA antibodies from pregnancies. This measure is to save lives. More information here:
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 3
Replying to @__ice9
Well, you can cite positive studies, and then there have been negative studies with some of the same agents. I also hear anecdotes directly from clinicians, but that’s why we need more RCT’s. As a country, we haven’t organized patients onto clinical trials effectively to learn.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 3
Replying to @__ice9
I’ve been following all the candidates you mentioned. Waiting for more definitive RCT data and then to enter into clinical practice guidelines.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 3
Replying to @__ice9
Clinicians should, of course, try to do something right now and repurpose drugs. Drug development is just a tough endeavor in general, and right now, only the dexamethasone study has really worked for , out of the vast majority of candidates attempted.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 1
Replying to @RobertLKruse
Key limitation meaning neutralizing titers in mice and protection levels for challenge may not translate to larger animals and humans.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 1
For people trying to interpret the vaccine data, there are lots of papers on protein-based RBD-vaccines for SARS and challenge data. Neutralizing titers >189 in this paper prevented infection in mice (*key limitation). Titer of 57 had mild infection.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD retweeted
Matthew Herper Jul 1
Experimental HIV drug seems effective at a twice-a-year dose, study finds
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jul 1
I'm personally a fan of RBD-focused vaccines. Been surprised more haven't just focused on it, since many of the neutralizing epitopes are there in this small 200aa domain. Good to see have success with RBD; I would guess protein RBD approaches would work as well.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 29
Replying to @tuuliel_lab
Wow, I learned a lot from all the responses in this thread. Been using Papers for a few years now. It does give me problems sometimes. Maybe I'll make the plunge into a different reference manager.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 29
So many no link between outcomes and ABO blood type after all. It was always a curious finding in the first place...
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 28
Replying to @eperlste
I guess my concern is the base editor option is irreversible, so we just need to be really confident in it before administering, especially in light of the other options (ex: small molecules, ASO, mAb) that could have less risk and be reversible.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD retweeted
Andy Biotech Jun 28
Very interesting work on a universal structure-guided design of betacoronavirus vaccines against , MERS and SARS using a dimeric form of CoV spike RBD - highly immunogenic and protective in mice - high yields in pilot scale production
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 28
Replying to @luc1fer83
Agree.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 28
Replying to @RobertLKruse
The competing strategy to what Verve is doing simply replaces LDLR in these FH patients. It could be safer. And newer ASO/siRNA technologies can just be dosed every couple months, with no HCC risk.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 28
Reading all the Verve/Beam stories. Are we sure base editing will ever truly be safe? There will always be off-target basepair changes in a 6 billion basepair human genome, and you'll never really know what happened. Somatic liver editing, just need a handful of cells to go wrong
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 24
Excellent paper from the Ring Lab in out today. Thoroughly enjoyed reading it today. Amazing what yeast display libraries and protein engineering can accomplish now.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 23
It’s not really a lie. Usage has dramatically increased compared to the last couple months. We desperately need donors right now to give blood.
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Robert Kruse, MD, PhD Jun 23
Replying to @megtirrell @AABB
Not really a usage spike. Combination of two factors: (1) donations are down as people socially distance and stay at home. (2) Resumption of elective surgeries brings demand back to normal levels.
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