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Robert Henley
Post-doc in the Ecker Lab at the Salk Institute. NEU Alum. Punk/Metal head. Pro wrestling enthusiast. Aspiring Harlem Globetrotter
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Robert Henley May 29
Replying to @RYHenley
I've used them and found them to be vastly superior to antibodies from Fisher that are produced in goat. And yet, I've had colleagues comment on how "weird" it is to use chicken antibodies. Why not use a superior product that also doesn't involve bleeding an animal unnecessarily?
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Robert Henley May 29
I wonder how much thinks about animal welfare when designing experiments? Steps can be taken to relieve unnecessary animal suffering. Aves Labs for example supplies chicken antibodies that do not require bleeding animals, simply obtain antibodies from egg yolks!
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Robert Henley May 29
I work with a mouse model but as a who's also a and cares about animals I'm beyond excited about this news! Hopefully this will spur on advances in organoid research Genomics institute to close world-leading animal facility
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Robert Henley May 23
Joe is quite literally the best teacher I've ever had. If you're looking for a PhD advisor in biology/physics and interested in bacteria you really couldn't do any better
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Robert Henley retweeted
AI Microscopy for Everyone. Apr 24
What is the largest image you can render? That was a FAQ at and will likely return at . Here is a rendered full mouse brain at cellular resolution. Imaged on a CTLS from by .
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Robert Henley Apr 23
Very exciting to see the things that are possible with this amazing device. And even more exciting to talk about how we might push it to it’s limits!
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Robert Henley Mar 6
Replying to @WanunuLab
Lots of exciting ideas here! Can't wait to see some papers!
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Robert Henley Mar 5
Im very happy to see that the Wanunu lab legacy of having way too much fun at BPS is alive and well
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Robert Henley retweeted
USBrainAlliance Nov 28
The BRAIN Initiative launched in 2014 with the goal of revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain. Now that the 10-year effort is nearly at the halfway pt, and review the initiative's progress, future in
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Robert Henley Nov 9
Replying to @jlee8usa
Any chance of a peak at a PDF version?
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Robert Henley Nov 2
Replying to @AnthArmentano
What if your speech is in character?
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Robert Henley retweeted
Lars Borm Oct 31
Very happy that our work on multiplexing smFISH is out! With & . In the below gif you can see how the signal of 33 genes builds up over 12 cycles of osmFISH, every dot is one detected molecule of the corresponding gene.
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Robert Henley Oct 25
Congrats to Noy Lab, another cool application of carbon nanotube porins. Many more interesting innovations to come I'm sure
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Robert Henley Oct 23
Replying to @garybader1
Very cool. But why use “map” to describe something that has no spatial component?
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Valentine Svensson Sep 25
Identify tissue structure with Automatic Expression Histology - Application to STARmap data.
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Robert Henley retweeted
WholeBrain Sep 20
In 2014 made a mesoscale connectivity atlas w viral tracing of over >100 of mice. Now, 4 years later, a tour de force idea of sequencing the connectome reproduces entire mesoscale connectome of cortex in a single mouse brain(1/5)
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Robert Henley Sep 20
Very true. Actually hadn’t thought of that, that must be what meant. Surprising to me that strand displacing is faster than plain extension. And even more surprising if this single difference is the cause of such a large discrepancy in read length
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Robert Henley Sep 20
That explanation certainly makes more sense to me. But if there is data showing differences in incorporation rates between the first read and second read of a molecule there must also be some interesting physical basis for the discrepancy as well
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Robert Henley Sep 20
Replying to @nothingclever @PacBio
Thanks for the insight! I’m curious how the two are physically different though...seems the polymerase is always performing RCA from the start. What is different about the second pass from the first?
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