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Prison Policy Init.
Challenging mass incarceration and over-criminalization through research, advocacy, and organizing. Get email updates:
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Prison Policy Init. retweeted
John Legend 21h
I get why everyone gets mad when rich person X gets a short sentence and poor person of color Y gets a long one. The answer isn't for X to get more; it's for both of them to get less (or even none!!!) We should level down not up.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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These are better arguments for criminal justice reform because they apply to ALL defendants. They don’t presume that violent crimes are irredeemable, nor that nonviolent crimes are always “victimless.” Our demands are stronger when they apply to all.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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12. Counties and cities should not rely on revenue from fines and fees to fund public agencies.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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11. If you're on probation or parole, a “technical” violation like missing an appointment with your parole officer should not be enough to send you back to prison.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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10. People who have committed crimes are still citizens, and a criminal conviction should never bar you from voting.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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8. It’s cruel to deny someone in prison basic necessities like medical care, nutritious meals, contact with their loved ones, and books. 9. It's wrong to make the families of people in prison pay for their loved ones' basic needs.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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6. No one should be behind bars just because they couldn’t afford an attorney, couldn’t pay cash bail, or didn’t have the money to pay fines and fees. 7. Healthcare professionals, not police, should be our first responders to mental health and drug crises.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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5. The justice system should give all defendants, regardless of race, income or any other factor, an equal chance to prove their innocence.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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4. Mercy is powerful. We should be giving judges and governors more opportunities to shorten sentences and exercise clemency, not less.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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3. At the local level, prosecutors and police should focus their limited resources on serious crimes rather than minor ones.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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2. We can hold people accountable for their crimes and help their victims heal without putting them behind bars for their entire lives. Other safe, prosperous democracies do this.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
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1. Everyone who goes to prison, no matter their crime, deserves a chance to redeem themselves and earn their freedom.
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 13
Here, in case you needed it, is a thread of good criminal justice reform talking points that don't draw arbitrary lines in the sand between “non-violent” and “violent” crimes:
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 12
Private prisons and jails hold less than 8 percent of all incarcerated people, making them a relatively small part of a mostly publicly-run correctional system.
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Prison Policy Init. retweeted
Worth Rises Sep 12
The movement for prison and jail keeps growing. The Santa Clara Board of Supervisors just approved a pilot program that will offer incarcerated people seven free 15-minute phone calls a week. Let's push for more!
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Prison Policy Init. retweeted
Dylan Hayre Sep 12
As long as any person is incarcerated, the ability to maintain connection to their community must be unimpeded and as facilitated as possible. This is a great resource from that offers some ideas on where to begin the for that goal.
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Prison Policy Init. retweeted
Kansas Coalition for Sentencing and Prison Reform Sep 11
Kansas is $6 for 15 minutes from jail and prison is 2.70 for 15 minutes if loaded from the outside and 2.85 if loaded from the inside and even more if you live out of state! The IC Solutions contract states that the KDOC gets 3.5 million off the top....
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Prison Policy Init. Sep 12
Is your state criminalizing poverty by suspending driver’s licenses for unpaid fines and fees? Find out with the campaign's interactive maps, and join the movement to end unjust license suspensions:
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Prison Policy Init. retweeted
John Pfaff Sep 11
Your own graph refutes your headline. The uptick we see is smaller than that ~2010, and has kept things at lower levels than then. I mean, *maybe* this is the start of a trend, and we shouldn’t ignore it. But this clear political framing by the BJS is profoundly disappointing.
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Prison Policy Init. retweeted
SOLOGLady Sep 11
Alaska's In-state telephone rate from it's prisons and jails is $3.00+ for a 15 minute call. This places a huge burden on families trying to lend support to their incarcerated loved ones.
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