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Dr Richard Kirby
1) Following in Charles Darwin's wake, I still use nets to sample the plankton today. This thread is a series of 32 weekly, short videos narrated by to introduce this remarkable world of microscopic life. RT to make this series a success.
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Dr Richard Kirby Mar 17
Replying to @zeiss_micro
2) Charles Darwin: Many of these creatures so low in the scale of nature are most exquisite in their forms and rich colours – It creates a feeling of wonder that so much beauty should be apparently created for so little purpose.
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Dr Richard Kirby Mar 17
Replying to @zeiss_micro
3) Here, introduces the phytoplankton, the microalgae that begin the marine food chain underpinning life in the sea.
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Dr Richard Kirby Mar 24
Replying to @zeiss_micro
In episode 4, introduces the diatoms. These tiny solar cells are the sea's most abundant microalgae bringing life to the ocean surface by their photosynthesis.
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Dr Richard Kirby Mar 31
Replying to @zeiss_micro
5) Here, introduces a phylum of diverse, single-celled organisms many of which are photosynthetic and are therefore part of the phytoplankton, these are the DINOFLAGELLATES.
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Dr Richard Kirby Apr 7
Replying to @zeiss_micro
6) The colonial phytoplankton PHAEOCYSTIS features in episode 6 as describes their foamy remains that we know as SPUME but which we often confuse for something sinister.
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Dr Richard Kirby Apr 14
Replying to @zeiss_micro
7) The phytoplankton's influence extends beyond the sea. Here, we see Phaeocystis and tells of some of its influences in the sky above, which may well surprise you.
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Dr Richard Kirby Apr 21
Replying to @zeiss_micro
8) Sir David Attenborough introduces the Coccolithophores. Widespread, single-celled, abundant phytoplankton these are important contributors to primary production and, as you will learn in the next episode 9, do much more besides.
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Dr Richard Kirby Apr 28
Replying to @zeiss_micro
9) Massive, 100-million-year-old chalk cliffs on England's south coast are made of Cretaceous phytoplankton and link the land with the sea. Listen as describes the Earth's amazing carbonate-silicate cycle.
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Dr Richard Kirby May 5
Replying to @zeiss_micro
10) The carbonate-silicate cycle described in episode 9 is so powerful it would remove all CO2 from the atmosphere without a restorative mechanism. In this episode describes how CO2 is returned and how we also now influence this process.
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Dr Richard Kirby May 12
Replying to @zeiss_micro
11) Copepods and krill are two examples of zooplankton primary consumers. In this episode explains the vital role these animals play in the marine food chain.
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Dr Richard Kirby May 19
Replying to @zeiss_micro
12) In this episode describes one of our planet's greatest animal migrations, the Diel Vertical Migration (DVM) of planktonic copepods in the sea.
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Dr Richard Kirby May 26
Replying to @zeiss_micro
13) Copepod reproduction. describes two very different strategies to reproducing and surviving in the plankton, where eggs are seen as food.
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Dr Richard Kirby Jun 2
Replying to @zeiss_micro
14) Copepods are the most important planktonic herbivores making a critical link between phytoplankton and higher trophic levels. Here describes their life cycle and how they feed the largest animals in the sea.
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