Twitter | Search | |
This is the legacy version of twitter.com. We will be shutting it down on 15 December 2020. Please switch to a supported browser or device. You can see a list of supported browsers in our Help Center.
Dr Richard Kirby
1) Following in Charles Darwin's wake, I still use nets to sample the plankton today. This thread is a series of 32 weekly, short videos narrated by to introduce this remarkable world of microscopic life. RT to make this series a success.
Reply Retweet Like More
Dr Richard Kirby Mar 17
Replying to @zeiss_micro
2) Charles Darwin: Many of these creatures so low in the scale of nature are most exquisite in their forms and rich colours – It creates a feeling of wonder that so much beauty should be apparently created for so little purpose.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Mar 17
Replying to @zeiss_micro
3) Here, introduces the phytoplankton, the microalgae that begin the marine food chain underpinning life in the sea.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Mar 24
Replying to @zeiss_micro
In episode 4, introduces the diatoms. These tiny solar cells are the sea's most abundant microalgae bringing life to the ocean surface by their photosynthesis.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Mar 31
Replying to @zeiss_micro
5) Here, introduces a phylum of diverse, single-celled organisms many of which are photosynthetic and are therefore part of the phytoplankton, these are the DINOFLAGELLATES.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Apr 7
Replying to @zeiss_micro
6) The colonial phytoplankton PHAEOCYSTIS features in episode 6 as describes their foamy remains that we know as SPUME but which we often confuse for something sinister.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Apr 14
Replying to @zeiss_micro
7) The phytoplankton's influence extends beyond the sea. Here, we see Phaeocystis and tells of some of its influences in the sky above, which may well surprise you.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Apr 21
Replying to @zeiss_micro
8) Sir David Attenborough introduces the Coccolithophores. Widespread, single-celled, abundant phytoplankton these are important contributors to primary production and, as you will learn in the next episode 9, do much more besides.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Apr 28
Replying to @zeiss_micro
9) Massive, 100-million-year-old chalk cliffs on England's south coast are made of Cretaceous phytoplankton and link the land with the sea. Listen as describes the Earth's amazing carbonate-silicate cycle.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby May 5
Replying to @zeiss_micro
10) The carbonate-silicate cycle described in episode 9 is so powerful it would remove all CO2 from the atmosphere without a restorative mechanism. In this episode describes how CO2 is returned and how we also now influence this process.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby May 12
Replying to @zeiss_micro
11) Copepods and krill are two examples of zooplankton primary consumers. In this episode explains the vital role these animals play in the marine food chain.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby May 19
Replying to @zeiss_micro
12) In this episode describes one of our planet's greatest animal migrations, the Diel Vertical Migration (DVM) of planktonic copepods in the sea.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby May 26
Replying to @zeiss_micro
13) Copepod reproduction. describes two very different strategies to reproducing and surviving in the plankton, where eggs are seen as food.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jun 2
Replying to @zeiss_micro
14) Copepods are the most important planktonic herbivores making a critical link between phytoplankton and higher trophic levels. Here describes their life cycle and how they feed the largest animals in the sea.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jun 9
Replying to @zeiss_micro
15) Amphipods are active predators in the plankton. Here, describes their adaptations for hunting. Carnivores, like amphipods, play a key role in the transfer of organic carbon upwards through the plankton food chain.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jun 16
Replying to @zeiss_micro
16) Chaetognaths (bristle jaws), also called arrow worms, are transparent, omnivorous plankton hunters eating both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, a copepod meets its grisly demise in the clutches of the predator's jaws.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jun 23
Replying to @zeiss_micro
17) Comb jellies, sea gooseberries, ctenophores. Three names for the same animal. When these predators bloom they can have a devastating effect on the abundance of copepods and other zooplankton prey. tells you how they catch their food.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jun 30
Replying to @zeiss_micro
18) Sea butterflies. These beguiling animals are abundant predators of other plankton. Let tell you about swimming sea snails in this short video and learn why they might sadly, disappear from the sea.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jul 7
Replying to @zeiss_micro
19) The meroplankton. introduces the extraordinary planktonic larval forms of creatures whose adults live on the seabed. The plankton provides these babies with plenty of food to grow and the surface ocean currents may disperse them to new places.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jul 14
Replying to @zeiss_micro
20) The plankton is a world of weird and wonderful creatures with astonishing adaptations for their survival. Here, describes the alien-like zoea larvae of crabs that look nothing like the adult animal they will become.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jul 21
Replying to @PlanktonPundit
21) On its journey from its larval life in the plankton to its adult life on the seabed the crab zoea becomes a megalopa. Let tell you about this hungry larval stage. @zeissmicro
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Jul 28
Replying to @zeiss_micro
22) Barnacle larvae settling from the plankton upon ship hulls instead of upon rocks on the seabed made keel hauling a feared punishment. Here, tells you why a planktonic larval stage helps barnacles and other seabed creatures succeed.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Aug 4
Replying to @zeiss_micro
23) Nobody knows whose baby this is. It's named the Y-larva or Facetotecta. Here, describes a true plankon mystery that has escaped understanding since it was first discovered over 130 years ago.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Aug 11
Replying to @zeiss_micro
24) The planktonic babies of echinoderms, like this heart urchin or sea potato (Echinocardium cordatum) larva, are some of the smallest and fragile of larvae. Here, tells you how they feed.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Aug 18
Replying to @zeiss_micro
25) The planktonic larval life of the starfish Luidia sarsi is quite unusual. Listen to tell you how this baby's life ends and the adult's life begins.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Aug 25
Replying to @zeiss_micro
26) A remarkable beginning to life. The snail veliger larva has a shell making it heavy and so it tends to sink. Here, tells you how this tiny baby stays up among the plankton to feed and grow before settling to the seabed.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Sep 1
Replying to @zeiss_micro
27) Here, introduces the planktonic larvae of worms. Life in the plankton is perilous and so the aim for many larvae is to grow fast and settle to the seabed quickly.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Sep 8
Replying to @zeiss_micro
28) Defence when tiny is important. 'Spikey' extensions are seen in phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, describes how tiny polychaete larvae protect themselves against predation. (It may also slow their sinking).
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Sep 15
Replying to @zeiss_micro
29) Jellyfish big and small are all members of the plankton and they are important predators. Here, tells you about one of the smallest jellyfish that has just caught a copepod.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Sep 22
Replying to @zeiss_micro
30) Jellyfish, through their predation, can influence zooplankton abundance and this includes the larvae of fish, and so more jellyfish in the sea will alter the food web. Here, describes recent changes in the abundance of jellyfish.
Reply Retweet Like
Dr Richard Kirby Sep 29
Replying to @PlanktonPundit
31) Most fish lay their eggs at the sea surface where they develop floating among the plankton. Listen to explain why.
Reply Retweet Like