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Marijn "i before j" van Putten
I discovered a new letter of the Arabic alphabet in the early Islamic period in Quranic manuscripts! In modern Arabic script jīm/ḥāʾ/ḫāʾ all have the same basic letter shape. However, in several early manuscripts final jīm is straight while ḥāʾ/ḫāʾ is curved.
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Marijn "i before j" van Putten Nov 14
Replying to @PhDniX
My article on this discovery has just come out in al-ʿUṣūr al-Wusṭā (Open Access!) This contrast is a continuation of the pre-Islamic ancestor of the Arabic script, Nabataean/Nabataeo-Arabic, that distinguishes the jīm from the ḥāʾ/ḫāʾ as well.
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Marijn "i before j" van Putten Nov 14
The whole issue of the journal is Open Access, and I share the volume with contributions by and and others! Go check it out!
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Marijn "i before j" van Putten Nov 14
Depends on your perspective I suppose. But I've discovered that the jīm is a distinct letter from 7ā'/khā' in undotted script. Since undotted letter shapes are the original form if the script, I'd say it's defensible to call it the discovery of a new letter.
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Dr Oyèyínká Nov 16
Replying to @PhDniX
I wonder if these kinds of discoveries will have any bearing on the Mecca/Becca controversy stirred by the work Mr Dan Gibson.
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Marijn "i before j" van Putten Nov 16
Replying to @DrFeruke
They will not. That controversy does not involve these letters. Mecca/Becca remains an unresolved issue and predates Gibson. Gibson's solution is linguistically untenable.
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A khelloufi Nov 15
Replying to @PhDniX
Amazing, is there a link to use for reference?
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Marijn "i before j" van Putten Nov 15
Replying to @ak1design
The link to the article is in the following tweet!
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حسين Nov 15
Replying to @PhDniX @ArnoldYasinMol
Some fonts use this method till today. It's more of a style.
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Marijn "i before j" van Putten Nov 15
Replying to @ArnoldYasinMol
No. It's not. There's no fonts that distinguish jīm from 7ā'. This distinction was lost in the 8th century at the latest.
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