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Paul Sax
Harvard/Brigham Infectious Diseases doctor, writer, editor, educator, blogger. Prefer baseball to football, pizza to sushi, Beatles to Stones.
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Paul Sax 4h
Replying to @kelechevarria
These are trade-offs we can each choose to make depending on our own preferences. -Last year's flu season lasted a long time, favoring a later vaccine. -Sporadic cases may be happening in your community, favoring early. What can we expect this year?🤷‍♂️ For me? Early-mid Oct.
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Paul Sax 13h
Yep. Check out cartoon here for a perfect depiction of the irresistible impulse facing most clinicians.
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Paul Sax Sep 21
Replying to @kelechevarria
You are: 1) very frugal. 2) quite prepared for Halloween. 3) trading off early flu season protection with late season vulnerability!
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Paul Sax Sep 20
I recommend getting your flu shot when you can no longer ignore ads and candy sales for Halloween. So usually late-September through early-mid October. (This is based on a highly scientific, rigorous, prospective study, funded by the makers of Snickers and Kit-Kats.)
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Paul Sax Sep 20
Replying to @MaxWildstein
Excellent perspective and gratitude. The first year I truly remember was 1967 (yes I'm old), so I've lived through a few bad eras. But mostly, it's been a winning team -- esp since 1994!
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Paul Sax Sep 19
Replying to @BranamDon
Yes -- cefpodoxime has been our standard at BWH for several years.
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Paul Sax Sep 18
It doesn't come close to this honor, but still is suitable for framing.
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Paul Sax Sep 18
So proud, had to share.
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Paul Sax Sep 17
The problem with this study is that the lengths of treatment (6 vs 12 days) DID NOT FOLLOW THE RULES.
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Paul Sax Sep 15
Replying to @JAMA_current @WSJ and 7 others
False dichotomy. Medical schools can teach both, the students can choose.
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Paul Sax Sep 15
The editorial page weighed in on medical school curriculum content in predictable fashion, thanks to a former dean. Some comments on this OLD MAN YELLS AT CLOUD piece. Latest post:
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Paul Sax Sep 14
Especially atovaquone, the yellow paint of antimicrobials. Yuck.
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Paul Sax Sep 14
Replying to @Elennaro
No offense intended, just sharing a pet peeve of mine. All ART is "highly active", and has been for years! -Period before effective ART: 1981-1996 (15 yrs) -Period of effective ART: 1996-2019 (23 yrs and counting)
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Paul Sax Sep 13
This is why OFID accepts submissions in any readable format! Manuscripts can be submitted in any common document format that can be easily opened and read by others. Right ?
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Paul Sax Sep 13
Two questions prompted by this news: 1. Will there ever be a vaccine for hepatitis C? 2. Do we need one? For both -- why or why not? Genuinely curious! Hepatitis C Vaccine Disappoints, Another in the Works via
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Paul Sax Sep 13
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Paul Sax Sep 12
The title of my blog has been a work in progress for more than a decade!
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Paul Sax Sep 11
Looking forward to it! FYI, "Sax, Bugs, and Drugs" was a proposed title for my NEJM blog. So glad I get to use it at the Annual Meeting, it was too good to waste! (h/t for thinking of it.)
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Paul Sax Sep 8
In which I go on a ramble discussing everyone's favorite HIV resistance mutation -- M184V -- and cite how much amazing progress we've made in management of people with resistance in just two years. (Bonus dog video.) Latest post:
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Paul Sax Sep 7
Send your ADAP this cartoon -- best-ever use of "how about never". (And big secret -- I just put in the most recent CD4 on our forms, even if they're years old. No one notices or cares.)
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