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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
A dog ran over these 2,000-year-old Roman tiles before they could dry, found in the Blackfriars area of Leicester, England.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
It's not just cats and dogs that ruin our days. This Roman tile was stepped on by the hoof of a sheep or goat over 2,000 years ago while it was lying out to dry.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
While the scribe of this 15th-century medieval manuscript from Dubrovnik, Croatia, was working, a cat seems to have jumped first onto the ink container and then on to the book, leaving it marked forever.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
The scribe of this book has written, β€œHere is nothing missing, but a cat urinated on this during a certain night. Cursed be the pesty cat that urinated over this book… because of it many others did too. And beware not to leave open books at night where cats can come.”
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
The scribe of this 13th-century Hebrew manuscript must have left it unattended while an oily-pawed visitor came prowling.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
Cats had an important role in Libraries and Scriptoriums. They controlled the mice and rats that loved to nibble on the pages of the books and caused a great deal of damage to many manuscripts, such as this one.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
This Roman rooftile was left out to dry in Gloucester, England, around 100 CE. Then a cat and her litter of kittens wandered over it.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
This 1st-century Roman tile seems to have been left on its side to dry, which created a fun obstacle course for this tiny kitten.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
This pawprint is from a Roman villa in the Rhineland, and was found on the hypercaust that kept the floor and the whole villa warm.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
Recent ultraviolet photography of this Japanese map from the 17th century, depicting the port city of Nagasaki, revealed the paw prints of a cat all over it.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper
This medieval Japanese manuscript was going well, until the scribe’s cat decided it wasn’t getting enough attention.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
That's all for now! Of course, humans are perfectly capable of screwing things up themselves, as this Roman tile shows.
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 19 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
Thanks for reading! If you enjoyed this, I've gathered together some threads on other interesting historical moments & artefacts here:
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 3 Sep 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
And if you'd like to chip me a tip, you can do so here:
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kitakataSOAP&WATERπŸ‡ͺπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ‡―πŸ‡΅ 20 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
Hmm - pretty paw penmanship if you ask me 😼
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Paul πŸŒΉπŸ“š Cooper 20 Feb 18
Replying to @kitakatakilburn
πŸ˜’
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Sam Barnett 18 Feb 18
This is brilliant. I wonder if there are any, even older, examples yet to be discovered. Cc @owl_my_head
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Chrystaroth #WearAMask 18 Feb 18
Monastery cats probably have a lot of spoiled vellum to answer for!
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Paul Buchanan 17 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
reminds me of Kuniyoshi's admiration for cats and his cat ukiyo-e prints
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Roz Kay 16 Apr 18
. - see this tweet and the others in the thread :)
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le chat, c’est moi #AllCatsAreBeautiful 20 Feb 18
Replying to @PaulMMCooper
Less scribing, more petting.
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