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Oxford University Press, publisher of Oxford Dictionaries, brings you news and insights from today’s world of words.
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Oxford Dictionaries 13h
When you play the , you win or you die... Here are 9 words you need to know to win! 👑
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Oxford Dictionaries 17h
Word of the Day: apterous
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 7
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 7
You probably know where 'Sherlock', meaning 'a person who investigates mysteries or shows great perceptiveness' comes from, but what about other traits named after fictional characters?
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 7
What does the 'hand' in the word 'handsome' mean? gets a handle on the history of 'handsome':
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 6
Word of the Day: tangelo
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The OED Dec 6
We’re pleased to announce that we will be running a paid summer internship programme for 2019, based in our Oxford offices. For information on how to apply, visit:
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 5
Word of the Day: zorbing
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 5
The linguistic journey of 'chauvinism' begins with one Nicolas Chauvin of Rochefort, a French soldier fighting for Napoleon whose demonstrative patriotism was the stuff of legend. Chauvin's one major disadvantage was that he probably didn’t exist...
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 4
Word of the Day: animus
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 4
Many contenders echo the chimeric nature of this mythical equine by combining 'unicorn' and 'pegasus' in portmanteaus such as 'unisus', 'uniped', and 'pegacorn', but another increasingly prominent term is 'alicorn', which has a much longer history...
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 4
✅ Such a question isn't intended to ELICIT an answer. ❎ You can imagine the amount of booing this ILLICITED.
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 3
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 2
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 2
The glamour of grammar, the story of spell; so potent is the dream that words hold magic that some of our very words for magic come from our words for words. Guest blogger Elyse Graham examines performative utterances in fact and fantasy:
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 2
According to a study by two researchers, the funniest word in the English language is... 'upchuck'! unpacks 'upchuck' and reveals the rest of the top ten funniest terms in the :
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 2
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 1
Pinch punch, it's the first of the month! How did December get its name? Here's one from the blog archives on naming the months of the year:
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 1
Blick, Flick, Glick, Plick, Snick, Whick, and Quee... or should that be Doc, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy, Bashful, Sneezy, and Dopey? What are the names of the Seven Dwarfs and who named them?
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Oxford Dictionaries Dec 1
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