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Oxford University Press, publisher of Oxford Dictionaries, brings you news and insights from today’s world of words.
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The OED 9h
To celebrate 90 years of the Oxford English Dictionary, we are pleased to be offering free access to the OED for all UK state schools and US and Canadian public K-12 schools for the duration of the 2018/19 academic year. Sign your school up here:
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Oxford Dictionaries 8h
This week's buzzwords range from extreme weather to anticlimaxes, and sleazy terms to sleazy fashion. It's 's latest :
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Oxford Dictionaries retweeted
Oxford Dictionaries 13h
Replying to @SCPHorobin
Indeed! We recently looked at this origin, and its newer sense, in a video:
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Oxford Dictionaries 13h
Replying to @SCPHorobin
Indeed! We recently looked at this origin, and its newer sense, in a video:
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Oxford Dictionaries retweeted
Simon Horobin 14h
meme is from Greek mimema 'that which is imitated', coined by Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) to refer to an element of culture or behavioural trait passed between individuals by non-genetic means
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Oxford Dictionaries 16h
Word of the Day: zeitgeber - a rhythmically occurring natural phenomenon which acts as a cue in the regulation of the body's circadian rhythms.
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 20
Americans: you should be dead chuffed if you get all of these right.
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 20
The use of the word 'like' to report a sentiment or an utterance (known as the 'quotative like') is strongly associated with the 'Valley Girl' stereotype. But this dialect feature is surprisingly philosophically complex, says Elyse Graham:
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The Bookseller Sep 20
Oxford University Press is offering schools in the UK free access to the online Oxford English Dictionary for its 90th anniversary:
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 20
"I before E except after C". It's one of the first rules you learn in primary school - but does the evidence really bear it out?
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 20
Word of the Day: thinko - a mistake in one's thought processes; a mental lapse or failure to reason correctly.
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 19
If you have an insufferable pedant in your life - or, indeed, you ARE that pedant - you'll know the difference between 'hung' and 'hanged'. But do you know why this difference exists?
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John Kelly Sep 18
Not sneezing, but I wrote about words for another bodily function, hiccuping, around the world for last year. Snag! Singhiozzo! Schluckauf!
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Oxford Dictionaries retweeted
The OED Sep 19
How sick* is the OED? Deliver a rejuvenating dose by contributing a word to our latest appeal, this time focusing on the language of children and the youth. We could do with some help. Bare help. *excellent, impressive, cool
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 19
It’s , which offers us the perfect excuse to dip a toe in the sea of nautical language. Take our quiz to see if you’re worth your weight in pieces of eight!
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 19
Word of the Day: tump - a small rounded hill or mound; a tumulus.
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Katherine Connor Martin Sep 17
I was curious to see what the most common 'as [adjective] as a [noun]' similes on our corpus were and the top 20 included one that was new to me: 'as useful as a chocolate teapot'.
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Jenny Lewin-Jones Sep 15
"Our words have an incredible ability to expand and contract. We might say that it’s in their nature – that it’s part of their very wordhood". Great piece on the noun-forming suffix '-hood' by for
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 18
There are a number of terms for Paris’s dining places, each with their own unique histories, which have entered Anglophone culture and language - but it’s not always clear where these terms originated or exactly what sorts of settings they refer to.
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Oxford Dictionaries Sep 17
Word of the Day: gonzo - relating to or denoting journalism of an exaggerated, subjective, and fictionalized style.
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