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Oxford University Press, publisher of Oxford Dictionaries, brings you news and insights from today’s world of words.
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Oxford Dictionaries 8h
Fahrenheit... 327?
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Oxford Dictionaries 9h
We're words people here at Oxford Dictionaries, unsurprisingly. But even we can get behind a few numbers - if they're packaged in some nifty phrases and expressions, that is.
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Oxford Dictionaries 10h
Find out the technical terms for various fears and phobias in our video:
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Oxford Dictionaries 12h
'It is not yet so long since Christmas that I have entirely forgotten gorbing multiple feasts over the holidays.' To 'gorb' is to ‘eat a large amount of food greedily’.
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Oxford Dictionaries 13h
Today, it feels like an antique word for a clown, conjuring up a jester pratfalling around a Renaissance court in a diamond-patterned onesie. But the etymology of 'harlequin' is surprisingly hellish...
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Oxford Dictionaries 14h
'Basil' goes back to the Greek 'basilikon', meaning 'royal', as it may have been 'used in some royal unguent, bath, or medicine' (according to the ).
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Katherine Connor Martin Jan 16
Great reminder from of the profound linguistic legacy of 'Paris is Burning' and the vibrant Vogue Ball culture it documented. So many words that you love today were invented by gay and trans PoC in 1980s NYC:
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Oxford Dictionaries 16h
Tackling the big questions this morning:
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Oxford Dictionaries 19h
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
Can you match the archaic or obsolete animal term with its modern day equivalent?
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
Who's Alec - and why does everyone think he's so smart?
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Lynne Murphy Jan 16
Difference of the Day: pronouns like 'mine', 'yours', 'ours' are often used to mean 'my/your/our house' in BrE, not much in AmE. So BrE speakers are likely to invite you back to *theirs*, and AmE speakers to invite you back to *their house/place*. Thanks
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
The 's earliest evidence for 'shade' in the sense 'contempt, disapproval, or disrespect' (as in, 'throw shade') comes from seminal 1990 documentary on Harlem's drag ball scene, 'Paris is Burning'.
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
When we say that someone has 'turned over a new leaf', it's these leaves being referred to: 📖. Not these ones: 🍃.
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
Disinterested & uninterested - are you clear on the difference?
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
"Get your Montgomery and your rollers on and head out to the discount!" Not making much sense? That'd be the fault of some pesky pseudo-anglicisms, my friend.
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Simon Horobin Jan 16
quibble is the diminutive of earlier quib ‘petty objection’, from Latin quibus 'for which, for whom', often found in legal documents and so associated with subtle distinctions or verbal niceties
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 16
There's a long-standing myth that you shouldn't start a sentence with a conjunction. But why on earth not? (See what we did there...)
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 15
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Oxford Dictionaries Jan 15
On Martin Luther King Jr., rhetoric, and Aristotle for
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