Twitter | Search | |
Oxford Mathematics
Official twitter feed for the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford.
774
Tweets
92
Following
7,389
Followers
Tweets
Oxford Mathematics Feb 19
Combinatorics pervades so much of Maths. But what is it and why is a question asked by Paul Erdős 60 years ago still puzzling the mathematical mind? Research explains.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Feb 15
The brain is still a poorly understood part of the human story. Can mathematics help to unravel its secrets, from growth to trauma and disease? Public Lecture 8 March, 5.15pm, GMT
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Feb 15
Boiling water? Magnets? The horizon of black holes? What links them? Research on its latest advances in conformal field theories via the Conformal Bootstrap
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Feb 12
What connects stamps, crime and Bart Simpson? An 18th Century Swiss mathematician doh! Public Lecture, Euler's pioneering, beautiful equation, 28 Feb.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Feb 2
Life is complicated. Or is it? The Public Lecture year from kicks off on 7 Feb with a biological journey (with lots of detours) courtesy of Michael Bonsall. Come along or watch live. &
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 26
“(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding” Just one of the songs on the playlist in Alain Goriely's 'Applied Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction from .
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 24
Mathematical trees? Oxford Mathematics Research studies unitary representations of Lie groups.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 23
Wrinkly Impact. Poking the skin of custard is all very well. But how about when you drop a sphere on a similar surface? Award-winning film from Research.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 18
Quantum Computers are on their way. But how do we ensure data security in the Post-Quantum World? Can our cryptosystems cope or do we need something new? Research explores.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 17
A warm welcome to our newly appointed Professor of Mathematical Finance. is delighted to announce that Rama Cont will join us later in the year.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 16
Global information analytics business is donating £1 million to in support of fellowships, research meetings and workshops
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 16
Sir John Ball, Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy here awarded the King Faisal Prize for Science
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 15
Gauge theory - where particle physics and mathematics meet. Research describes the latest progress.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 12
The mathematics of security - researchers and undergraduates expose security flaw.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 11
Applied mathematician from awarded a Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship for 2018.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics retweeted
Ursula Martin Jan 5
History of Computing beyond the Computer, Oxford 21-22 March, with Marie Hicks, Andrew Hodges, Adrian Johnstone, Cliff Jones, Julianne Nyhan, Mark Priestly, Reinhard Siegmund-Schultze
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 11
Plenty more resolutions came in, but we'll finish with this simple one that says it all, maths or otherwise: "My resolution for 2018 is publishing my first paper."
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 11
While an Pure Mathematician's aim for 2018 is "calculating the number of edges in the n-dimensional hypercube that could be cut by a hyperplane." Lots going on round here.
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 11
And this from an Applied Mathematician: "My mathematical New Year resolution for 2018 is to understand the dynamics of stratified flows at large scales using statistical mechanical methods. Stratified fluids are ubiquitous in the oceans and the planetary atmospheres."
Reply Retweet Like
Oxford Mathematics Jan 11
And to continue from an Emeritus Prof. proving you should never stop searching. "My resolution for 2018 is to seek to prove that that same group G can be embedded as a subgroup of a cartesian product of 3-dimensional projective linear groups over finite fields of unbounded size."
Reply Retweet Like