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The Orianne Society
The Orianne Society is a 501(c)3 wildlife conservation organization dedicated to conserving reptiles, amphibians, and critical habitats.
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The Orianne Society 7h
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The Orianne Society 7h
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some of them are expected to lay a third clutch in July. Every nest we document gives us a better understanding of the species, and we're hoping to find several more before wrapping up the project.  
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The Orianne Society 7h
Here in the Longleaf Savannas Initiative, we're continuing to track female Spotted Turtles into the summer and were recently rewarded with a few more nests! As June came to a close, the majority of our turtles had just laid their second clutch of eggs for the year, and at least
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The Orianne Society 16h
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You can learn more about our Rattlesnake: Protect - Educate - Conserve campaign and get your campaign shirts at 
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The Orianne Society 16h
13 days until ! You asked: What do you do if you receive a bite from a venomous snake?
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The Orianne Society Jul 3
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You can learn more about our Rattlesnake: Protect - Educate - Conserve campaign and get your campaign shirts at
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The Orianne Society Jul 3
14 days until ! Trying to keep snakes out of your yard? Join Chris as he talks about what attracts snakes and how to cohabitate with rattlesnakes in wild places.
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The Orianne Society Jul 3
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For this first week, we’ll kick things off with a fairly easy one. It’s a springtime chorus from coastal South Carolina, consisting of just 2 species. Go!
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The Orianne Society Jul 3
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frog species all calling at once. This might make things more challenging, but we encourage everyone to give it a shot and put your guesses in the comments! We will then follow up with the correct answers later.
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The Orianne Society Jul 3
3.Welcome to ! Starting today and continuing through the summer, we’ll be posting a weekly recording of a mystery frog chorus for you to test your frog call knowledge! Just like when biologists do frog call surveys, most of these recordings will contain multiple
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The Orianne Society Jul 2
We are half way there! 15 Days to ! Timber Rattlesnakes are sit and wait predators. In this video, Chris talks about this and defensive position.
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The Orianne Society Jul 2
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The Orianne Society Jul 2
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habitat. However, even in the open, their slim bodies can still be easily overlooked by the casual observer.
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The Orianne Society Jul 2
The Rough Green Snake (Opheodrys aestivus) is one of the most arboreal snakes in the Eastern United States, and due to their vibrant green coloration, they can be difficult to spot among dense foliage. These snakes are most frequently seen by people while they cross roads between
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The Orianne Society Jul 1
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The Orianne Society Jul 1
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The Orianne Society Jul 1
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had largely wrapped up. While we did not have game cameras out at the time this particular nesting beach got hit by the first wave of hungry raccoons, we did get footage of a raccoon walking right up to a gravid female Wood Turtle to give her a sniff. Thankfully the turtle was
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The Orianne Society Jul 1
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they are still predators and their elevated population size can mean their natural prey take a much heavier hit. At some sites we started monitoring this year for Wood Turtles, raccoons found and destroyed a large proportion of turtle nests less than one week after nesting season
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The Orianne Society Jul 1
Raccoons, skunks, foxes, and a few other mammals in the northeast are what is known as “subsidized predators”, meaning their populations are much larger than you would expect in a natural setting due to human activity. While raccoons might be content getting fat off of garbage,
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The Orianne Society Jul 1
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You can learn more about our Rattlesnake: Protect - Educate - Conserve campaign and get your campaign shirts at
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