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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Over the last 100 years, that has steadily changed. In some disciplines, like anthropology, majority of students are now women.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Although higher education at every level is still too white, too male, and too wealthy, it has changed and that is finally being reflected.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Now students and faculty are finally saying no to white supremacists, racists, eugenicists, and others operating at universities.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Academic freedom was, from the beginning, about marginalized people's voices finally having a place in the university.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
The continuation of the struggle for academic freedom means broadening the debates at universities. Not returning to the past.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
The fact that campuses are finally objecting to white supremacists speaking is direct evidence of the success of the free speech movement.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
For hundreds of years academic institutions could reproduce white supremacist propaganda without being challenged. That's over.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
The expansion of academic freedom to a critique of the facilitation of oppression by the academy itself leads to this struggle for justice.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
If the New York Times refuses to print a white supremacist rant on the front page, no one calls that oppression of free speech. Same thing.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Universities have obligations to communities and to the public, but they are not uncurated public squares for soapbox rants.
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Michael Oman-Reagan
For universities to finally fulfill their obligations to communities they need to elevate marginalized voices, not voices of the oppressor.
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Jodi Jacobson Mar 6
thank you.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
For hundreds of years Black voices, Native voices, and LGBTQI voices were excluded. Now: Uninvite the racists and invite the marginalized.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
If you want to talk about free speech and academic freedom, look at the history of those movements in universities and *who* led them.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Black students, women, Native students, LGBTQI students, and others whose voices had been silenced led the fight for free speech.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
The teaching and recognition of Black histories and Black experience in particular were a central force in the revolution in the university.
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
Despite this - those programs are minimally funded, sometimes shut down, and instead people are inviting eugenicists to speak? Nope.
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xSmurf Mar 6
Probably true in part, but Birth of a Nation also led the fight for free speech actually 😬 Before it didn't really apply to arts
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Michael Oman-Reagan Mar 6
The people who occupied the university buildings and revolutionized higher education for student power didn't do it so Mr Racism could talk.
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xSmurf Mar 6
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