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Olivier seynnes
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Olivier seynnes Jul 1
That’s harsh, people have already bought their tickets to see your stand up performance 😏
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Olivier seynnes Jun 28
Got a similar experience with another BMC journal a few months ago. Very disappointing to say the least.
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Olivier seynnes Jun 23
A compelling literature review on the force-velocity relationship of skeletal muscle. Great work from ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ and ⁦
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Olivier seynnes Jun 7
Most of the merit goes to and the team but thanks! In addition to these challenges, we think that current theoretical assumptions explain the counterintuitive changes in strain pattern.
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Olivier seynnes May 24
Replying to @And_Hegyi @rcsapo79
It works but only computes a straight trajectory unfortunately.
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Olivier seynnes May 24
Replying to @rcsapo79
Thanks Robert. Tested on the GM and VL. It is mainly designed for fully visible fascicles but can do linear extrapolations if the FoV is too narrow.
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Olivier seynnes May 23
Replying to @OlivierSeynnes
The script combines existing macros and plugins for ImageJ Fiji to provide objective and reliable estimates of architectural parameters in superficial muscles with minimal extrapolation. We wrote a technical note to describe it, available as preprint: . 2/2
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Olivier seynnes May 23
In the much debated analysis of ultrasound scans of muscle architecture, manual segmentation -- and the associated risk of bias -- does not seem to be challenged so often. and I teamed up to design a simple and open source solution to automatise this process. 1/2
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Olivier seynnes May 20
Replying to @JohnRHutchinson
Someone sarcastic would have added point 4) no more leniency based on reputation 😏. Point 1) seems like the only one that is hardly debatable, I agree...
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Olivier seynnes May 20
Replying to @JohnRHutchinson
I second this. Always thought double-blind was the least bad solution. What are the arguments against it?
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Olivier seynnes May 9
Last paper from ’s PhD. How is muscle-tendon behaviour adjusted when joint moment/work is increased under different conditions during running? We are grateful for the great insights from the reviewers.
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Olivier seynnes Apr 25
The increase in tendon stiffness did not alter tendon stretch but reduced recoil. How much this is due to methods is unclear to us but we also suspect that simple in-series models may be too inaccurate here... 5/5
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Olivier seynnes Apr 25
Replying to @OlivierSeynnes
Kinematics and kinetics were unchanged after training and, contrary to our expectations, fascicle shortening pattern was relatively preserved in both muscles. 4/5
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Olivier seynnes Apr 25
Replying to @OlivierSeynnes
The novel aspects were 1. to check that kinematics and kinetics would remain similar, 2. to estimate strain patterns of the Achilles tendon per se and 3. to see whether the increased tenon stiffness would not particularly affect soleus fascicles. 3/5
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Olivier seynnes Apr 25
Replying to @OlivierSeynnes
Building on the great work by Albracht and Arampatzis (EJAP, 2013), we examined the influence of training aimed specifically at increasing tendon stiffness on the behaviour of muscle-tendon behaviour during running. 2/5
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Olivier seynnes Apr 25
New article from Dr. 's PhD work indicating that TS contractile behaviour during running is relatively preserved after resistance training, despite an increase in Achilles tendon stiffness and ankle moment during stance remaining similar. 1/5
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Olivier seynnes retweeted
Greg Nuckols Apr 23
"Exercise-Induced Myofibrillar Hypertrophy is a Contributory Cause of Gains in Muscle Strength" Glad this is finally published! I think , , , and me put together a pretty compelling case.
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Olivier seynnes Apr 18
Replying to @neuromecHAHNics
Thanks Daniel. I may have forgotten/overlooked some of these results. I’ll take a new look asap.
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Olivier seynnes Apr 18
This is interesting. Eccentric behaviour has not really, if at all, been seen in fascicles from human lower limb muscles investigated with US.
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Olivier seynnes Apr 18
I wish this was possible in humans. This video clearly shows that fascicles or even representative fragments of fascicle cannot be tracked reliably in this muscle. It seems that they are moving out of the plane of the ultrasound beam.
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