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Nicholas Mallos
dad + husband \ director , science-based solutions to \ surf, soccer, beer. \ tweets my own
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 20
: A First Look at What and I Learned About Ocean Plastics during Expedition. via
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IMCC5 Feb 18
We can't wait to know your cool research and fantastic marine conservation works! Don't forget to submit your abstract to by March 16!
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Wilderness Society Feb 18
"Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt." - John Muir
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 18
Replying to @MiriamGoldste
Survey says 100% YES...more Elasmos, less Elmos!
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 16
Investigating the effects of in the Canadian 's Lab .
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 14
A fascinating dive that offered massive abundance and diversity, many species of which are endemic only to or neighboring Ascension Island.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 13
for your leadership and flawless execution on all aspects of the expedition. We are grateful to have been a part of the world class Team to collect first-ever data on on .
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 12
Mesmerizing last day in the water tracking whale . After a slow morning, a big male greeted us while en route to Jamestown dock. He stayed with us in the water for 20+ minutes and then gave a proper send off as we said farewell to Expedition .
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 12
The ease with which this lone Chilean devil ray (Mobula tarapacana) glided through 's waters was humbling. Luckily its curiosity allowed and I to have some unforgettable encounters.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 12
And in developed economies our use of single use disposable plastics is exorbitant. As such, we must focus on reducing our single use consumption while also addressing waste collection and recycling in developing economies.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 11
Very lucky to work with so many incredible scientists on a regular basis, who just happen to be women. Happy
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 11
He’s been staring at me all week but I finally conquered . The joy of climbing 699 steps straight uphill was short lived tho given it’s also 699 back down. Still 100% epic and I’ll now depart this magical Island wholly content (& w/ sore legs)
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 10
Quite a privilege to be in the presence of the on her final voyage. This vessel has been ’s lifeline for 27 years, and has impacted the life of every Saint in some way or form. Today we were fortunate to join her heartfelt farewell celebration.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 10
Never been to a place that’s so dramatic in every way. After spending the week on the beach looking up in awe, our final day was spent on top of Diane’s Peak National Park looking down...again, in speechless awe.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 10
Over the past week we’ve swam, scaled, repelled and ridden onto 10 beaches. Each beach has told a different story—aspect, wind/current exposure and access yields highly variable debris composition; caps, bottles and being the constants.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 9
Just hours after departing Sandy Bay , a local Saint encountered this horribly entangled green at the exact location we cleaned. A disturbing reminder that we find on beaches is a microcosm of what turtles, whale etc face below surface.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 9
Correct. Caps with identifiable brands often allow us to trace to a specific region or country. And since so few brands are sold in bottles here on island, we can say with confidence speak re bottle caps. Will do additional analysis to confirm though .
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 9
So appreciative of the incredible effort this great Team put into our plastics research plan over the past week. In addition to grueling days on the water tagging whale they swam, climbed and hiked to sample beaches anytime we asked.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 9
Today’s Sandy Bay Cleanup again underscored that every piece of debris has a story, and that very little plastic debris on beaches comes from the Island. Thanks to for joining us on the beach.
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Nicholas Mallos Feb 9
Returning to Sandy Bay Beach today to cleanup with the next generation of leaders. Local marine biology students are tackling head on, and we look forward to having them as a part of ’s global .
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