Twitter | Search | |
The New Yorker
Unparalleled reporting and commentary on politics and culture, plus humor and cartoons, fiction and poetry, reviews, and criticism.
92,876
Tweets
431
Following
8,632,597
Followers
Tweets
The New Yorker 10m
"Matzo balls are straightforward," writes. "Which is another way of saying that they live and die in the details."
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 35m
The activist Shane Claiborne refers to himself as a “holy troublemaker.” Recently, he hopped on a decommissioned school bus to travel the country, collecting and melting down guns along the way.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 1h
A pair of L.A. entrepreneurs are redesigning the Holy Book in their own millennial likeness.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 2h
“There are no good kings. / Only beautiful palaces,” writes in his magical and matter-of-fact poem, “The Palace.”
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 2h
The Borowitz Report: “This is nothing more or less than a direct attack on the lying life style,” the White House press secretary said. “You take away my right to lie and you take away my ability to earn a living.”
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 2h
Bored at a family dinner? Try a fun new conversation starter. For example, “What is the government hiding?”
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 3h
The comedian Ramy Youssef’s willingness to joke about nearly everything tends to obscure the fact that he is religious.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 4h
In his new Netflix special, much of Kevin Hart’s self-exposure seems more like gossip management than authentic self-probing.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 5h
What do you do if your child accidentally locks your iPad for 25,536,442 minutes?
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 6h
“You Go, Girl! How to Balance Being a Mom and Being a Silent Figurehead for a Deeply Unstable Presidency”
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 7h
What the Mueller report portrays, in numbing legalese and revealing footnotes, is a breathtaking culture of lying and impunity, distrust and double-dealing. And Donald Trump is its greatest beneficiary.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 7h
Susan Choi’s thrillingly interesting new novel, “Trust Exercise,” toys with the themes of appropriation, and with the reader.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 12h
According to the Mueller report, the former national-security adviser Michael Flynn said that Donald Trump repeatedly asked him to get Hillary Clinton’s e-mails.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 13h
Plants can’t cry. How are you supposed to tell when they feel happy or thirsty or sad?
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 13h
The Mueller report contains a cast of characters stranger than fiction: a Russian real-estate mogul, a British music producer, a convicted felon, an “author who holds a doctorate in political science” (hint: Jerome Corsi), and, of course, Jared Kushner.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 14h
The Mueller report reveals that Donald Trump’s campaign associates were actively pursuing Hillary Clinton’s private e-mails during the period when the Russians were hacking into them.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker retweeted
Michael Luo 14h
1/ The Mueller Report is now for the history books. published a fantastic series of pieces today. Here they are in tweet thread.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 15h
“This is the end of my Presidency,” seems as though it will go down as one of Donald Trump’s most memorable quotes, writes.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 15h
Before Lucas Hnath’s plays found critical acclaim, he worked a day job to pay the rent, and wrote in his windowless office until 2 A.M. Now, his name is one that theatregoers can’t escape.
Reply Retweet Like
The New Yorker 15h
Why was Donald Trump so afraid of Robert Mueller and his investigation? A confrontation described in the Mueller report could shed more light on the true source of the President’s fear.
Reply Retweet Like