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National Zoo
The Smithsonian's National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute is a leader in animal care, science, education, & sustainability.
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National Zoo 10h
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National Zoo 11h
🐊🌎 Smile, it's ! Think you're safe from a Cuban crocodile on land? Think again. They are adept at swimming, walking and leaping, so they're equally at home in/out of the water. 👋 Meet our crocs at the Reptile Discovery Center! KEEPER TALKS: 11 a.m. + 3 p.m.
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National Zoo 12h
🐥Our chick at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia is spreading his wings! He is flying well, and is very sassy. It will still be several months before he has his blue and orange adult plumage.
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National Zoo 13h
Congratulations to Lonnie G. Bunch III on his first day as 14th Secretary of ! Best wishes from our wild and wonderful Zoo family! We are excited to have him at the helm!
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National Zoo Jun 16
When spooked, a La Plata three-banded armadillo rolls up into a ball! The strong, bony plates on its back aren't attached to the skin on 2 sides, allowing the armadillo to neatly tuck its head, legs + tail inside. 👋 Meet small mammals @ 10:30am/2pm daily
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National Zoo Jun 16
Happy from our rad dads to yours!
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National Zoo Jun 15
🌳🐻 Let’s build a tree house! Andean bears build platforms in trees using branches, which help them reach food 🍎 or serve as a spot for snoozing. 💤 Meet our beary awesome Andean bears, Billie Jean & Quito, at keeper talks @ 11 a.m./2 p.m. daily! 👋
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National Zoo Jun 14
Healthy diets aren’t just for humans. Zoo animals have nutritionists, too! SCBI researchers recently studied the bacterial communities (microbiome) in the gut of rhinos to recommend a health-boosting diet for black rhinos in human care.
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National Zoo Jun 14
Nothing says like dad jokes and animal. We ain't lion. 🦁
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National Zoo Jun 14
📸Camera traps in helps scientists track and monitor 🐴Przewalski's horses that have been reintroduced to the wild. The horses live in family groups made up of several mares, a dominant stallion and their offspring.
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National Zoo Jun 14
From everyone at the Zoo and Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, we are wishing a fond and furry farewell! Thank you for your leadership as the 13th secretary of
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National Zoo Jun 14
🐵🕘 Hang in there...it's almost the weekend!
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National Zoo Jun 13
In March, Smithsonian researchers visited Laikipia, Kenya, to participate in community engagement and education, and to talk about One Health — the intersection of human, animal and environmental health. Read more >>
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National Zoo Jun 13
🐘 Instead of measuring numbers alone, identifying when the populations of large animals, like Asian elephants, are no longer growing may be a more effective way to help save them. ➡️
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National Zoo Jun 13
🐻🔥 From 1950 to 1976, the real Smokey Bear lived at the Zoo. The beloved character lives on through the Smokey Bear Wildfire Prevention campaign, which launched in 1944. His message—“Only You Can Prevent Wildfires”—is as relevant as ever. 📸
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National Zoo Jun 12
🌾SCBI landscape ecologist Hila Shamoon spent the first two weeks of April working with colleagues at American Prairie Reserve to place GPS collars on plains bison in the grasslands of the Reserve. Get the scoop in her latest blog! 📸 SCIENCE SNAPSHOT: .
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National Zoo Jun 11
🦖 Dinosaurs once dominated the earth. 👀Come see what it might have been like to live among them. ➡️
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National Zoo Jun 11
❤️🦍🐵 With 1 y.o. gorilla and 2.5 y.o. orangutan growing up at the Great Ape House, primate staff are taking the rare opportunity to study how mothers + infants communicate using gestures. 🧠 KEEPER Q&A: .
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National Zoo Jun 10
🥚🦎 For years, the Reptile Discovery Center’s Asian water dragon female lived alone. While examining eggs as part of a study, animal keepers made a shocking discovery—one was fertile! How could a female lay a fertile egg without a mate? 🔬 KEEPER Q&A: .
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National Zoo Jun 8
🌊 Our scientists are trying to protect corals from extinction and make healthier corals.
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