Twitter | Search | |
NatGeoMaps
Since 1915, National Geographic Maps has been responsible for illustrating the world around us through the art and science of mapmaking.
3,041
Tweets
194
Following
30,242
Followers
Tweets
NatGeoMaps 12h
By 2050 the world’s population is expected to reach 9.8 billion. Nearly 70 percent of this booming population—6.7 billion people— is projected to live in urban areas.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps 18h
Mysterious waves have been pulsing across Oklahoma
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps 21h
Map of the Day: "Where the poppies grow" from the February 1985 issue reveals legal and illegal poppy cultivation areas.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 15
Once considered nearly impenetrable, the Arctic is taking on new strategic importance as climate change melts its icy armor and trillions of dollars of resources become accessible.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 15
Alaska’s last vast wild place is open for drilling.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 14
Silicon Valley, nicknamed for its early days of silicon-chip innovation and manufacturing, has grown from a techie outpost around Palo Alto to a sprawling Bay Area region of high-tech industries and ever higher housing prices.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 14
Genetic tests of ancient settlers' remains show that Europe is a melting pot of bloodlines from Africa, the Middle East, and today's Russia.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 13
Spiders spin webs out of silk, but they also use their threads as slingshots, submarines, and hang-gliders.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 13
Map of the Day: For rural Tanzanians the threat of lion attack rises and falls with the phases of the moon, the nocturnal predators favoring the darkest nights. "When Humans Are Hunted" appeared in the August 2013 issue.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 13
Since humans last visited the moon in 1972, we’ve inhabited research stations orbiting Earth and sent robotic craft to venture even farther into space to take selfies on Mars, plunge into Jupiter, and investigate our solar system up close.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 12
By mid-century if not sooner, Arctic summers are expected to be hot enough to melt most of the sea ice that forms in winter. Here’s what that looks like, based on a model suggesting it will first happen in 2036
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 12
Furry animals with ducklike bills that lay eggs? Gliding possums? Creatures that tote babies in belly pouches? This physical map of Australia, published in February 1979, highlights the fascinating abundance of wildlife found throughout the continent.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 12
Centuries of storytelling paint the four species of hyena as laughing, demonic scavengers. But hyenas are actually Africa’s most successful predator.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 11
Alaska's National Petroleum Reserve, where millions of birds come to nest and raise their young, is now under threat from petroleum development.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 11
Completion of the Aswan High Dam meant flooding the historically rich Nile River valley and the certain loss of many ancient sites. Some of the treasured temples and tombs were relocated to higher ground.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 11
Map of the Day: This December 2015 infographic depicts the New York Skyline. Since 2004 dozens of towers more than 700 feet high have been built or are under construction.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 10
Large oil spills have significantly decreased over the past 49 years. Fifty percent of all large spills occurred while the vessels were underway in open water.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 10
Dominated by St. Peter's Basilica and its embracing colonnade, Vatican City covers 108.7 acres on a site known to ancient Romans as Mons Vaticanus. This illustrated map appeared in the December 1985 issue.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 10
Greater Tokyo’s more than 37 million residents make it the world’s most populous metropolitan area. Millions commute through a dense urban landscape that has expanded over the centuries, built atop fertile plains hemmed in by volcanic mountains.
Reply Retweet Like
NatGeoMaps Sep 9
After the voyages of Christopher Columbus, European powers began mapping the New World. The boundaries they drew reflected their own imperial ambitions and rivalries, with little regard for the indigenous people who lived there already.
Reply Retweet Like