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National Geographic
Taking our understanding and awareness of the world further for 130 years
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National Geographic 1h
Drift away from all your stress at these beautiful lakeside destinations
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National Geographic 4h
"Certainly our genes are enormously important, but they’re not the only things that are passed down from our parents."
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National Geographic 7h
How did a Bavarian professor end up creating a group that would be at the center of two centuries of conspiracy theories?
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National Geographic 9h
Is climate change happening too fast for animals to save themselves—and their future offspring—by adapting quickly?
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National Geographic 11h
Arctic foxes are difficult to spot and film—especially when in their springtime camouflage
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National Geographic 13h
The illegal commercial elephant skin trade was just described by researchers last year—but it's already spreading
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National Geographic 14h
Why would leaders propose listing a creature that went extinct 4,000 years ago as endangered? To protect elephants.
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National Geographic 15h
“Hiking around the cliffs of Mykines in The Faroe Islands, I spotted a puffin sitting on the edge of the rocks below watching the waves come crashing in,” writes Your Shot photographer Paul Boomsma.
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National Geographic retweeted
Dr. Maya Wei-Haas Aug 19
Thousands of miles beneath your feet, our planet's inner core is doing something weird—and scientists aren't entirely sure what. Is it rotating? Is oscillating? Is it squishily deforming? I dig into this curiosity for my latest
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National Geographic 17h
Hundreds of bodies at Roopkund Lake belonged to pilgrims who perished in a Himalayan storm more than a thousand years ago—or so researchers thought
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National Geographic 18h
Earth's inner core is a roughly moon-size ball of iron floating within an ocean of molten metal—meaning it's free to turn independently from our planet’s large-scale spin
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National Geographic 19h
To this day, insects smaller than a child’s thumbnail remain the most dangerous nonhuman animals on the planet
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National Geographic 20h
Could coconut crabs—the world's largest land invertebrates—have played a role in Amelia Earhart's fate?
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National Geographic 21h
"Vaccines save us from diseases, then cause us to forget the diseases from which they save us"
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National Geographic 23h
The non-negotiable, one-shot challenge requires pulling oneself up from an “unexpected” fall through the ice
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National Geographic Aug 20
Records of nuclear explosions during the Cold War are helping scientists calculate one of the most precise estimates yet of how fast the planet’s inner core is spinning
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National Geographic Aug 20
Dogs' eyebrow anatomy is the latest example of how 20,000 years of cohabitation has made our pets finely tuned interpreters of human emotion
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National Geographic Aug 19
Despite being the world’s largest oceanic stingray, this species is very rarely spotted alive, and almost nothing is known about it
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National Geographic Aug 19
Tens of thousands of caves sprawl beneath Tennessee’s hills and farmlands, making for the perfect spelunking road trip
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National Geographic Aug 19
Sit back and enjoy the rest of with some awe-inspiring images of wildlife!
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