Twitter | Search | |
This is the legacy version of twitter.com. We will be shutting it down on 15 December 2020. Please switch to a supported browser or device. You can see a list of supported browsers in our Help Center.
Naqad Studies
The Karbalah Inscription (DKI 163) is dated to 64 AH / 683 CE, and is indicative of a transition period in proto-Islamic expression. In it, we see the solidification of older prayer formulas, while others were still very much in development.
Reply Retweet Like More
Naqad Studies Dec 2
Replying to @NaqadStudies
The inscription begins with the Basmala, in the form we know it today. In the middle of line five, we see a long rectangle, indicating the end of a set prayer (lines 1-5), probably copied from a known source. Lines 2-5 lack a verb, indicating the lines are describing Allāh.
Reply Retweet Like
Naqad Studies Dec 2
Replying to @NaqadStudies
After the prayer ends in line five, we read the inscription's appeal to Allāh as "Lord of Gabriel, Michael and I/Asrāfīl." Before various traditions coalesced around Muhammad as the core prophetic figurehead, 7th c formulae invoked Allāh as Lord of Mūsa, ‘Isà, & other prophets.
Reply Retweet Like
Naqad Studies Dec 2
Replying to @NaqadStudies
DKI 163 represents a late point in religious transition. It would only be a few years before inscriptions would produce the name Muḥammad or Praised One in formulae. Famously, the Dome of the Rock inscription (70 AH) is a very early example of a Muḥammad-centered formula.
Reply Retweet Like
Naqad Studies Dec 2
Replying to @NaqadStudies
We also read the then-common appeal in inscriptions for an individual to be forgiven of past and future sins, a formula which reminds us passages such as: "That Allah may forgive thee [Muhammad] of thy sin that which is past and that which is to come." Q 48:2
Reply Retweet Like
Naqad Studies Dec 2
Replying to @NaqadStudies
Lastly, we see the 64 AH date reckoning, which is well known to have been in common use in the 1st/7th c. We have inscriptions and papyri that supply AH dates to within a few years of 622 CE, so this tradition was well established by the time of the inscriber of DKI 163.
Reply Retweet Like
Naqad Studies Dec 2
Replying to @NaqadStudies
For further reading: Crossroads to Islam: The Origins of the Arab Religion and the Arab State By Yehuda D. Nevo, Judith Koren
Reply Retweet Like
Χοδαδάδιος Ρεζαχανίδης 🇮🇸🇪🇺 Dec 3
Replying to @NaqadStudies
What is the significance of saying amin, amin as a way of atoning for sins. Is there a precedence or Quranic justification for repetition of a prayer as a way of asking penance?
Reply Retweet Like
حسام الدين بن زايد Dec 3
It's not repetition the first Amin is at the end of the sentence (forgive whoever says Amin)
Reply Retweet Like
Ali Minai Dec 3
Please unroll
Reply Retweet Like
Thread Reader App Dec 3
Guten tag, there is your unroll: Thread by : The Karbalah Inscription (DKI 163) is dated to 64 AH / 683 CE, and is indicative of a… . See you soon. 🤖
Reply Retweet Like