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Nakawe Project
Environmental & Wildlife . We aim to spread the word about localized problems and educate people on how to take care of the .
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
Replying to @NakaweProject
This is why they are currently listed as Endangered on the IUCN. Today, they are subject to dangers of large ship strikes, marine debris, climate change, and food depletion. Photo: Mike Johnson
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
Replying to @NakaweProject
These stunning mammals numbers dwindled after being whaled for their blubber to make oil. They gained protection under the International Whale Commission in the 1960s but have had a significantly difficult time recovering.
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
Replying to @NakaweProject
is their primary source of and they are well known for the loud sounds they make in the . These clicks are also believed to help them navigate their way through the deep where there isn't any light.
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
Replying to @NakaweProject
The Blue Whale is a nomad that spends the winter months in warmer waters to grow and breed. They then travel towards the cold water of the poles to replenish themselves with food during the winter.
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
Replying to @NakaweProject
These amazing mammals use their baleen 'teeth' to intake water which contains the krill and then use their elephant size tongue to push the water back through the baleen leaving only the krill behind to digest.
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
Replying to @NakaweProject
and their hearts as much as an automobile! This is amazing considering their diet consists primarily of krill.
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Nakawe Project Jul 17
We would like to introduce to you the largest marine mammal in the sea (and on our planet) - the Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)! . According to these whales are 30 meters (100 ft) long and upwards of 200 tons! Their tongues alone can weigh as much as an elephant -
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Nakawe Project Jul 16
Replying to @SteveDeNeef
Show your support. Have you encountered a wild Mako shark before? Share your experience and tag Photo:
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Nakawe Project Jul 16
Replying to @NakaweProject
From South , the US to Mexico, Mako sharks are already a key focus for a number of platforms, with more opportunities still to be developed around the world. Yet, Mako are assessed as and benefit from little .
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Nakawe Project Jul 16
Replying to @NakaweProject
Obviously, sharks are wild and don't run on a schedule, but maintaining healthy populations is important in order to mitigate the risks of a "no show". Only can we feasibly secure the future of a shark ecotourism industry if we protect them from over-exploitation and .
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Nakawe Project Jul 16
Replying to @NakaweProject
Many tourists will travel long distance just to have the opportunity to the encounter of a . But no wants to spend thousands of only to be disappointed because of a "no show" from the they came to see in the .
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Nakawe Project Jul 16
Replying to @NakaweProject
But how can this transition appear as a viable option when populations are dwindling down? . , like any other platform, needs to be able to rely on the fairly consistent presence of .
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Nakawe Project Jul 16
We believe that can provide a great alternative to shark fishing. As continues to grow around the , the opportunity for coastal communities in proximity to shark hot like are becoming more apparent.
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Nakawe Project retweeted
Nautilus Liveaboards Jul 15
Juvenile whale sharks feed on calanoid copepods in shallow waters off Bahía de Los Angeles. Photo
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Nakawe Project Jul 15
Replying to @NakaweProject
but some of cow have seven pairs! These are also considered the most 'primitive' living sharks, and their bodies resemble their ancient ancestors. . Photo: filippoborghi5 .
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Nakawe Project Jul 15
Have you ever seen a shark!!? . Cow sharks, from the Hexanchidae, generally live in cold, deep and are identifiable by the extra pairs of gill slits they have. Most of cow have six pairs of gill slits (compared to most having five) -
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Nakawe Project retweeted
Jim Abernethy Jul 14
Video by // Lemon Shark "Nakawe" getting some love from me at Tiger Beach, Bahamas. Nakawe was named while Regi was Aboard from working on her film "Game Over Fishing"…
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Nakawe Project Jul 14
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Nakawe Project Jul 14
We must get the Shortfin Mako shark, along with its cousin the Longfin Mako included in Appendix II so they can benefit from greater . will be there. Will you join our voices? Let's make some noise together. Photo:
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Nakawe Project Jul 14
Replying to @CITES
Last year the ICCAT conducted assessments in the and found that the was and that was still occuring. . CoP18 is taking place in Switzerland this August.
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