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National Science Foundation
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National Science Foundation Jul 20
On the , Vice Chair Dr. Ellen Ochoa shared with us a brief glimpse of her impressions of the Apollo missions, and how they have helped shape her career.
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National Science Foundation Jul 19
Happy to our friends ! The moon landing is truly inspiring, and we continue exploring the depths of space from NSF’s ground-based observatories. With exciting images and new data coming from & , who knows what the next big discovery will be!
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National Science Foundation Jul 19
Replying to @NSF
Learn more about the role NSF's Kitt Peak National Observatory played in the Apollo astronaut's scientific training
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National Science Foundation Jul 19
Replying to @NSF
Apollo 11 astronauts, Aldrin and Collins visited Kitt Peak on Apr. 29, 1964. The visitor’s log shows their signatures & describes the viewing conditions: “seeing fair, flashes of good (Moon low)” 5 yrs later, they made their historic voyage to the Moon.
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National Science Foundation Jul 19
Replying to @NSF
Completed in 1962, the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope was the most sophisticated solar telescope in the world. Its great light-gathering ability and superior resolving power made it an important tool for early lunar mapping and photography.
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National Science Foundation Jul 19
Before going to the Moon, Apollo astronauts visited NSF’s Kitt Peak Nat'l Observatory to learn about the lunar surface. Here, astronauts Schweikart, Bean, & Cunningham view the Moon through the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope using these “astronaut eyepieces.”
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National Science Foundation Jul 18
Replying to @NSF
Time’s up, Gumshoes! Trick question. All of them! Contact featured Arecibo in 1997, GoldenEye had the telescope stand-in for a secret base in Cuba in 1995, and in 1991 it was featured in the kids’ TV show Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego. How’s that for a
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National Science Foundation Jul 18
Replying to @NSF
Radio telescopes are sensitive to radio frequency interference, which is why Green Bank Observatory, is located in a 13,000 sq mi National Radio Quiet Zone. Near the telescope itself, that means no Wi-Fi, cellphones or microwaves
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National Science Foundation Jul 18
Replying to @NSF
Solar telescopes are often painted white to help with visibility and cooling of the telescope. High altitudes can be helpful for finding still or smoothly flowing air, which helps reduce atmospheric interference
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National Science Foundation Jul 18
Ready for a crash course on 3 types of ground-based telescopes? Of course you are! Optical telescopes are sensitive to light pollution and are often located at high altitudes where skies are clearest. They often use adaptive optics to make images larger, clearer & more detailed
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National Science Foundation Jul 18
Replying to @NSF
Pop Quiz! Which film featured the NSF-supported Arecibo observatory?
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National Science Foundation Jul 18
Arecibo observatory in Puerto Rico is world-famous. The 1000 foot diameter radio dish has been used for all kinds of amazing experiments and discoveries—including the first observations of exoplanets and repeating fast radio bursts—all from the heart of the jungle.
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National Science Foundation retweeted
NYU Tandon Jul 17
Oded Fulcar, computer science teacher at ISLA school in the demonstrates ⁦⁩ Boebot at ⁦⁩ funded course at
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National Science Foundation Jul 16
Replying to @LIGO
We don’t just use telescopes—sometimes other types of observatories are needed. In 2016, NSF’s announced that we had found proof of gravitational waves— Einstein was right! 5 years later, LIGO is still running and making more detections than ever before.
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National Science Foundation Jul 16
In the inky dark of space, no one can hear you scream...but here on Earth, we can hear black holes collide. In this clip, we can hear the sound of two black holes colliding 's .
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National Science Foundation Jul 16
Researchers are laying the groundwork for high resolution "heat maps" within urban heat islands to protect residents and improve city planning.
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National Science Foundation Jul 15
Seventeen years ago, ALMA was a dream, a blueprint and an artist’s rendering, and now it is one of the largest and most complex observatories on Earth. Take a virtual tour, see a live 360 feed, and learn more:
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National Science Foundation Jul 12
Great compliment that a newly discovered diatom (microalgae) has been named after 's National Ecological Observatory Network. Welcome Adlafia neoniana! Discovered through analysis of aquatic samples collected in Puerto Rico.
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National Science Foundation Jul 12
Replying to @GeminiObs
Correction: Gemini is not currently part of NOAO. We apologize for the error.
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National Science Foundation Jul 12
If you’re going to take a photo of something as large as a black hole, you’re gonna need a bigger telescope. Anchored by NSF support, linked radio telescopes across the globe to create one giant telescope, giving us our first look at a black hole.
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