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Portrait Gallery
National Portrait Gallery, London. World's largest collection of personalities and faces. Admission free.
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Portrait Gallery 14h
Happy birthday to fashion designer, , born 1940. This extravagant bust, by sculptor , was created in 1989. At the time Logan told Rhodes, ‘I’m going to sculpt you in case you dye your hair black.’ Of course, Rhodes never did…
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Portrait Gallery 18h
With just finished, we're celebrating the release of our new publication '100 Fashion Icons', which features designers, models and trendsetters from the Gallery's collection. Shop now:
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Portrait Gallery retweeted
Lichfield Cathedral Sep 18
Celebrate Samuel Johnson’s Birthday and see a unique portrait loaned to us from the National Portrait Gallery. Visit to find out more about COMING HOME
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
English politician Mo Mowlam was born 1949. Mowlam became the first woman secretary of state for Northern Ireland in 1997, playing an integral role to the Good Friday agreement. Discover the female politicians in our collection:
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SIX 👑 Sep 10
Ok Tudor fans, the HAUS OF HOLBEIN ART EXPERIENCE is here! 😁👑 Follow the link to find out more and book tickets
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
That's all we've got time for as part of today. Thanks to our curators, and thanks for all your questions! For more insights, head to our blog:
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
At the NPG, identity of the sitter is key for permanent displays. Otherwise - and the order of importance changes - the artist, quality of work, condition, and importantly how it contributes to the story you're trying to tell. Catharine MacLeod, Senior Curator 17th C Portraits
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
Replying to @KitKatPortrait
4. When I got my first curatorial job 12 years ago in a small gallery, I remember thinking "I need to get some practical DIY skills." I wasn't prepared for quite hands-on being a curator can be, especially in smaller organisations where you wear many hats.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
Replying to @KitKatPortrait
3. I do! We work with portraits, each of which tell remarkable stories about the sitter, the artist, their making and their times. They're meant to be seen so sharing them across social platforms helps to make them more accessible to a much wider audience.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
19th-Century Collections Curator Dr Sarah Moulden () is on hand to answer some of these!
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
Variety makes being a curator so interesting, but it's also what makes it complex. Your day can involve research & writing to brainstorming exhibition titles & overseeing rehangs. It's knackering, but there's never a dull moment! - Curator, 19th C Collections.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
What do you love about your job? Clare Freestone, Curator, Photographs: Working with original objects - in photographs that's everything from an 1840s cased daguerreotype through to a contemporary high-end digital print. In portraiture each has a story to tell.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
Replying to @MontacuteNT
2/2 We'd love a painting of Margaret Cavendish - currently we only have prints. Bess of Hardwick we have, and is currently on display at , Somerset.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
Catharine MacLeod, Senior Curator of 17th Century Portraits: Light damage, water or humidity damage, pigment deterioration and discolouring, accidental damage. Our professional conservators are on the case! 1/2
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
Curator of 19th Century Collections : Curators usually have a postgrad degree in a relevant area but work experience in a cultural organisation is wonderfully valuable. Top advice would be to look at everything, be curious & ask questions.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.” William Shakespeare, As You Like It.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 18
It's day! Our curators will be on hand to answer your questions from 12 - 3pm. Reply to this tweet using the hashtag.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 17
Watercolour painter Samuel Prout was born 1783. In 1819 Prout joined the Old Watercolour Society and took his first overseas trip, travelling to France. It was here that he found his niche – precise depictions of gothic buildings in a natural but picturesque style.
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Portrait Gallery Sep 17
Do you have a favourite from this year's award? Vote now to be in with a chance of winning an oil painting set, courtesy of :
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Portrait Gallery Sep 16
“We have no other means of recognising a work of art than our feeling for it” Philosopher and art critic Clive Bell was born 1881
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