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Natural History Museum
The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities.
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Natural History Museum retweeted
Wildlife Photographer of the Year 22m
With an increasing number of cars on the road, roadkill is a common sight in America and it is estimated drivers kill more than a million vertebrates every day. In 's image, one such animal is offered a last moment of love and dignity.
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Natural History Museum retweeted
NHM Meteorites 22m
The Shergotty, Nakhla & Chassigny together at last.
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Natural History Museum 39m
Replying to @adrg1
There's still much to discover about hydrothermal vents on Earth and how life evolves in these seemingly inhospitable environments. A Museum team is currently exploring vents around the north coast of Iceland.
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Natural History Museum 41m
Replying to @NHM_London
Cassini discovered that another moon of Saturn, Enceladus, has a global underground ocean with hydrothermal vents. Life may have begun in similar conditions on Earth. Explore these vents on Earth and why they are likely candidates for the origin of life:
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Natural History Museum 48m
Saturn usually appears golden in images, as its thick clouds are predominantly yellow 🪐. So scientists were surprised when NASA's Cassini spacecraft returned images of the planet's northern hemisphere showing a blue sky.
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Natural History Museum retweeted
NHM Oology 2h
An egg of the once mysterious ‘Ungilo’ or Smew - it was described in 1859 in John Wolley’s account in when this egg, along with 3 others, was swapped for eggs of the Siberian Jay + 20 copecks! Today it is one of the earliest known Smew eggs available for research.
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Natural History Museum retweeted
National Army Museum 3h
Replying to @NHM_London
2/3 In the picture above, Napoleon's depicted riding his Arabian horse, Marengo. Marengo was captured by the British at Waterloo and his skeleton ended up with us. Read more about how we teamed up with to conserve and remount it for display:
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Natural History Museum retweeted
REX 3h
Replying to @rov_REX
Our dives (both ROV & SCUBA) are now complete, so today we're making sure all the data and samples are in order, and starting to pack up the lab and equipment. Meanwhile, the vents in the fjord keep on venting, as they have for the past ~10,000 years...
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Natural History Museum 4h
Sponges filter water - but did you know that they can also filter other animals' DNA? It means scientists could build detailed pictures of entire ecosystems using just the humble sponge.
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Natural History Museum retweeted
NHMdinolab 4h
Preparing some future web content for with and Duncan Gregory, with stunning Morrison exposures near Shell in tye background
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Natural History Museum 4h
Replying to @Wizarding_about
Almost... we have a preserved giant squid called Archie:
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Natural History Museum 5h
'It's a great resource to have in the classroom that you can use to adapt to your own lesson plans within different topics that you are doing within the school' - Fiona MacIsaac, Principal Teacher . Download our free teaching resources:
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Natural History Museum 5h
Hi there! According to our dino expert , no one knows! It is likely that due to their enormous size, animal's such as Dippy would have been eating a few hundred kilograms of food per day, so their poop may well have been a few kilograms in weight 🦕🦖
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Natural History Museum retweeted
Citizen Science at the Natural History Museum 5h
Challenge complete: A recap of results! Our blog post is now live, read it here at:
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Natural History Museum 5h
Replying to @endart17now
Thanks for highlighting this. Many of our galleries were produced many years ago, but we do have an ongoing programme of updates so it's really helpful to get feedback on anything we should be prioritising. Could you send details of what you noticed to feedback@nhm.ac.uk?
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Natural History Museum 6h
Replying to @SamThird
It looks like the larva of a harlequin ladybird - there's a picture and more info here:
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Natural History Museum 6h
Replying to @hstanley_ @momee591
Please use our online contact form to send feedback to the Museum: Apologies if we missed previous requests for this info.
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Natural History Museum retweeted
Alexandra McGoran 8h
It’s time to play “What’s This ?” If you recognise the product it really helps me with my research. I think the top looks like ‘ED’, the red is ‘LARGER’ followed by ‘COLDER’. What do you think?
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Natural History Museum retweeted
Digitising the NHM 7h
Found on this day in 1906 this thistle ermine (Myelois circumvoluta) wasmoth belongs to the pyralid moth family that we have been digitising. Find out more:
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Natural History Museum retweeted
geoffreylondon 20h
Here's a little taster of the footage from the team, shot down 's microscope, with the help (and patience) of and . Some hydroids, isopods, bryozoa, caprellids and nematodes.
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