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NASA Moon
NASA's official account about Earth's Moon. Our Moon is the entryway to our solar system and our universe. Come here for updates on the Moon and beyond.
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NASA Moon Apr 22
"We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth." - Bill Anders, Apollo 8 Anders' iconic Earthrise photo taken in 1968 helped spark the first . Can you see why?
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NASA Moon retweeted
David J. Skorton Apr 19
Our traditions may differ but we all share one world and one moon. Thinking of many colleagues and friends celebrating Passover, Easter, and Mid-Sha'ban this weekend. These three holidays are all linked to the phases of the moon.
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NASA Moon Apr 18
Replying to @NASAMoon
In the southern hemisphere, autumn is in full swing and this full Moon is the Hunter's Moon. . Happy lunar observing!
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NASA Moon Apr 18
The Moon will be opposite the Sun on April 19th at 11:12 UTC. The 4th full Moon of the year goes by Pink, Fish, Worm, Sap, or in Nez Perce tradition, 'Flower Time.' It's also the Paschal Moon and signals the upcoming celebrations of Passover and Easter.
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NASA Moon Apr 18
LADEE may have impacted the Moon 5 years ago, but its science lives on. Just this week, we announced that LADEE had found evidence of water vapor released from meteor impacts on the Moon!
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NASA Moon Apr 18
Correct - it's an artifact from image stitching. This mosaic contains 288 images taken by over one month.
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NASA Apr 16
While we get ready to send our farther than ever before, understanding the conditions of deep space is critical to keeping them safe & happy. A change they’ll encounter is a 50% increase in radiation. Here’s how we’re preparing for it:
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NASA History Office Apr 17
1970 - Jim Lovell (c), Jack Swigert (r) and Fred Haise (l) safely return to Earth after their "successful failure" on Apollo 13. Splashdown in the South Pacific came at 1:08 pm Eastern Time on April 17. Shown here on the recovery ship USS Iwo Jima.
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NASA Solar System Apr 17
With this all-star* cast, you’d think we’d be a shoe-in for this year’s , but it’s up to the public to vote by April 18: See all the nominees at *Ok, one star, but lots of planets, asteroids and comets ☄️
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NASA Moon Apr 16
You may have heard that we plan to send humans to the Moon's South Pole by 2024. Why the South Pole? It's particularly interesting scientifically and contains useful resources - like water and extended sunlight.
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NASA History Office Apr 16
NOW (12:54am ET) in 1972, Apollo 16 launches from . John Young, Ken Mattingly and Charlie Duke would arrive at the Moon about 4 days later to conduct an array of scientific experiments:
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Replying to @VinnyChirayil @NASA
Global mapping of the same regions using Chandrayaan-1’s spectral data did not yield measurable water in the top millimeter. What the LADEE observations tell us is that indeed the lunar surface has the dichotomy of a dry soil on top of a wet one. (2/2)
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Replying to @VinnyChirayil @NASA
These measurements actually explain what seemed to be a discrepancy in observations taken by past missions. Lunar Prospector measured what could be interpreted as water in the bulk top meter of soil. (1/2)
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Replying to @Anthony33131352 @NASA
It is either water (H2O), its related hydroxyl (OH), or both that are being released. The instrument cannot differentiate between them.
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Replying to @RWMann
While the temperature of the surface swings between extreme hot and cold, the temperature of the soil at a few cm depth is a benign ~ -30 C. That’s due to the low conductive property of the material. The top few centimeters act as an insulating layer to the soil underneath.
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Replying to @NASAMoon
The hydrated soil is drier than the driest desert 🏜 on Earth. You would need at least half a ton to yield one 8 oz. glass of water. 🌒🥤
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Replying to @NASAMoon
When micrometeoroids hit the lunar surface, they release water vapor that enters the Moon’s thin atmosphere. Some of this water falls back on the Moon and may be the source of water ice we’ve found at the Moon’s poles.
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NASA Moon Apr 15
Scientists on our LADEE mission have discovered a global layer of hydrated soil beneath the lunar surface. The water in the soil is ancient, possibly dating back to the formation of the Moon.
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Jim Bridenstine Apr 11
While regrets the end of the mission without a successful lunar landing, we congratulate SpaceIL, Israel Aerospace Industries and the state of Israel on the accomplishment of sending the first privately funded mission into lunar orbit.
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NASA Moon Apr 11
Today, 's Beresheet lander will be the first private company to attempt to land on the Moon. & contributed to the effort with guidance and an instrument onboard. Let's go Beresheet! (and here's what the Moon looks like today)
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