Twitter | Search | |
NASA Climate
Rocket science isn't enough; we're climate scientists, too. Find us at . RTs, links & follows are not endorsements.
4,740
Tweets
665
Following
319,328
Followers
Tweets
NASA Climate 1h
In August, more than 100 scientists will sail west from Seattle, Wash. to study the role oceans play in absorbing carbon from Earth’s atmosphere and how phytoplankton absorb, store and release that carbon.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA GISS Jun 18
May 2018 was the fourth warmest May and spring 2018 was the third warmest spring in 138 years of modern record-keeping. Only May 2016 (+0.91°C), 2017 (+0.88°C) and 2014 (+0.85°C) were warmer than the past month.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA Earth Jun 14
How a satellite launched in 1960 altered the design of balls. And can you tell which of these images matches with Russia and which with Saudi Arabia?
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA GISS Jun 14
As we head into the 2018 Atlantic season, it's a good time to reflect on the accomplishments achieved by the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) since its 2016 launch.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate Jun 13
Ice losses from Antarctica have tripled since 2012, increasing global sea levels by 0.12 inch (3 millimeters) in that timeframe alone, according to a major new international climate assessment funded by and .
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA Earth Jun 12
Flying over the Amazon with an instrument firing 300,000 laser pulses per second, our scientists have made the 1st 3D measurements of rainforest canopies in the region. With this, they hope to understand the effects of a recent -driven drought:
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA Earth Jun 8
.’s new “Waterways from Earth” feature uses our satellite 🛰 and astronaut 👩🏽‍🚀 images.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate Jun 6
The scientific method is the gold standard for exploring our natural world, and scientists use it to better understand .
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate Jun 6
Activity in the Pacific may foreshadow another event. Here’s what we’ve found.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate Jun 4
🌱 How ’s soil moisture data are helping the globally monitor and forecast crops
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA Earth May 31
⚡️ “How will our planet react to the increasing levels of CO2?”
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate May 31
Carbon – an essential building block for life on Earth – does not stay in one place or take only one form. Using our vantage point from space, we can understand changes to the balance of carbon moving between the atmosphere and land.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate May 24
Atmospheric rivers are getting bigger and more volatile. New -led study predicts 10 percent fewer of these “rivers in the sky” by the end of the century, but with heavier rain and stronger winds.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA May 22
, our twin satellites launched into space at 3:47pm ET from in CA. This dynamic duo will track the continuous movement of water & other changes in Earth’s mass on & beneath the planet’s surface. Discover more:
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA Earth May 22
Today’s the day launches on a Falcon 9! 12:47pm PT / 3:47pm ET / 7:47pm UTC Space Launch Complex 4E Vandenberg Air Force Base, California Live launch coverage begins at 12:15pm PT on
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate May 21
Tune in TODAY at at 10:30 a.m. PT / 1:30 p.m. ET to learn more about , launching tomorrow on from Vandenberg Air Force Base. Got questions?
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate May 17
April 2018 was the third warmest April in 138 years of modern record-keeping: . The global average concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide was about 407 parts per million (ppm).
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate May 16
In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists have combined an array of NASA satellite observations of Earth with data on human activities to map locations where freshwater is changing around the globe and why.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate retweeted
NASA GISS May 16
April 2018 globally was the third warmest April in 138 years of modern record-keeping. Only April 2016 (+1.07 ˚C) and April 2017 (+0.92 ˚C) were warmer than the past month and April 2010 (+0.84 ˚C) was only insignificantly cooler than this year’s April.
Reply Retweet Like
NASA Climate May 15
Operation , NASA’s longest-running airborne mission to monitor polar ice change, concluded its springtime survey of Arctic sea and land ice, via .
Reply Retweet Like