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Corazon Mexica
A Chicano artist of the Mexicayotl, dedicated to the art and craft of pre-Hispanic spirituality.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 16
Nanahuatzin breaks open Tonacatepec, The Mountain of Sustenance, and reveals Chicome Coatl, Seven Serpent, the goddess of maize. The Tlaloque descend, and carry the sacred corn to the four corners of the earth. A detail from the painting, Th Birth of Corn
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
My painting of Xipe. He dances on the earth, and were his heel spins corn and vegetables grow. He is life, summer, death, and rebirth. You can find him as a print in my etsy shop.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
The hands of his skin dangle at his wrists, and he dances with his own thigh bone in his hand.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
He holds in one hand the sacrificial Tecpatl knife with which he had flayed himself, and in the other the Mist Rattle which announces the coming of the rains.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
On his back, his golden skin garment is tied on with strips of the same skin. He is life within death and death within life. He is the dry field of winter which awaits the rains of summer to grow,.and the green summer which holds the death of winter within it.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
His mouth and eyes peer through the mouth and eyes of his skin mask, and over his heart is tied skin. He is like the corn, whose husk is ripped off,.just like his skin was peeled away.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Xipe Totec, the Flayed Lord, god of spring, patron of goldsmiths. In ancient times, a famine struck mexico. Xipe heard the cries of the starving people, and peeled off his own skin. Where it fell, maize grew. He thus wears the skin of a flayed man.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
My mother poses in traditional Zapotec garb, which I purchased for her when I lived in the Zapotec town of Juchitan. To visit a Vela, a traditional party, the regalia is required. We are not Zapotec, but her mother was Huichol, another tribe from Jalisco.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
We chose our sacred Nahuatl names at the Spring. I am now Amatlahpalli, "sheet of paper," or "Bird Wing," which seemed appropriate to me as an artist who paints on paper
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
The spring emerges from the roots of a great Ahuehuete tree. It is the beginning of the pilgramige to visit Oxtoteotl, the Lord of the Cave, who is a manifestation of Tezcatlipoca at Chalma
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
My Calpulli at the naming ceremony at the Spring of the Ahuehuete at Chalma
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
Mitzlimitl, the Arrow of the Moon, and Xopapapalotl, Summer Butterfly, bathe in the sacred Spring.
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Corazon Mexica Jul 11
Xopapapalotl bathes in the sacred spring at Chalma during a naming ceremony
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Corazon Mexica Jul 8
Tlaloc, the lord of rain, enthroned on clouds in his paradise of Tlalocan. He feeds, nourishes, and protects us. This painting is available as a print in my etsy shop.
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Corazon Mexica Jun 25
One of my paintings in watercolor; a self portrait as the brothers Martin Cortez. It's available as a print in my Etsy shop.
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Corazon Mexica retweeted
Lycaon Jun 23
En la época inca, la chicha de jora (aqha o azua, en quechua) era preparada por las acllas (Vírgenes del Sol) muchos días antes del Inti Raymi, una de las festividades religiosas más importantes del mundo andino-amazónico, cuya bebida sagrada era ofrecida en el culto al sol.
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Corazon Mexica Jun 23
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
Here are some examples of Aztec glyphs for Turquoise
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Corazon Mexica Jun 23
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
The Xiuhcoatl, the Turquoise Serpent, is the spirit animal of Xiuhtecuhtli and the weapon of the sun, Huitzilopochtli, and symbolizes fire, heat, and time.
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Corazon Mexica Jun 23
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
The Tlatoani, or emperor, wore a crown and nose ring made of turquoise, which bring to mind the power of fire and the authority of Xiuhtecuhtli, the father of the Teteo.
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Corazon Mexica Jun 23
Replying to @MiCorazonMexica
or "Xiuhtetzaqualco," the "Turquoise Enclosure," which is also the home of Xiuhtecuhtli, the Turquoise Lord, who is the father of the Teteo, the gods, and the lord of fire, time, and wisdom. The brilliant blue of turquoise is like the blue at the center of the hottest flame.
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