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MerfolkMagic
Educational Rundown of the long overdue Depictions of Racism in Magic Bannings: (with references) 1: Invoke Prejudice (1994) This card is the most egregious of everything banned today for being blatantly racist. See artist details and '1488' reference below.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
The public CardID for Invoke Prejudice was '1488', a code phrase. Referencing the "14 Words" slogan: "We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children." The second is 88, which stands for "Heil Hitler" (H being the 8th letter of the alphabet).
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
With this banning, the CardID has been changed. The artist of this card has allegedly been closely associated with White Supremacy/Neo Nazi movements. Wizards of the Coast has not worked with this artist since 1997.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
2. Cleanse (1994) With the obvious reference being "Racial Cleansing", Cleanse is a card that was printed after the already pseudo-identical card "Wrath of God", specifically omitting out everything but Black. This itself is not racist but combined with..
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
The flavor text referencing the elimination of 'each foul beast', this card has more than enough innuendo for those with limited imaginations to make the racial connection. The intention is the issue here. This card could've been called, literally anything else and been fine.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
3. Stone Throwing Devils (1993) STD makes religious references to annual Islamic Hajj pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. During this ritual Muslims throw pebbles at three pillars otherwise known as 'jamarat'.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Each Jamarat represents a temptation from the devil. Throwing stones rejects those temptations, and each 'crush' or rejection brings the person closer to god 'Allah'. Note that the jamarat symbolizes the devils, the stone throwers are people.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
The card and its artwork reverses these references and depicts Muslims themselves as the 'Stone Throwing Devils' on top of the ledge looking at the 'Jamarat'. Again, the intention here was Anti-Islamic. The depiction of Devils has been prevalent throughout magic..
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
The issue of this card is very obviously not around the inclusion of Devils themselves but rather the associated religious metaphor, depicts muslims as devils.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
4. Pradesh Gypsies (1994) (1.5 Other Designations) The Romani are widely known in English by the exonym Gypsies, which is considered by some Roma people to be pejorative due to its connotations of illegality and irregularity
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
The Council of Europe consider that "Gypsy" or equivalent terms, as well as administrative terms such as "Gens du Voyage" (referring in fact to an ethnic group but not acknowledging ethnic identification) are not in line with European recommendations.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
In North America, the word Gypsy is most commonly used as a reference to Romani ethnicity, though lifestyle and fashion are at times also referenced by using this word. I did not previously know this, but have educated myself on this topic and will refrain from using the word.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
5. Jihad (1994) Jihad is a controversial topic even among muslims. The word jihad appears frequently in the Quran with and without military connotations often in the idiomatic expression "striving in the path of God (al-jihad fi sabil Allah)"
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Islamic jurists and other ulema of the classical era understood the obligation of jihad predominantly in a military sense. They developed an elaborate set of rules pertaining to jihad, including prohibitions on harming those who are not engaged in combat.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
In the modern era, the notion of jihad has lost its jurisprudential relevance and instead given rise to an ideological and political discourse. While modernist Islamic scholars have emphasized defensive and non-military aspects of jihad,
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
some Islamists have advanced aggressive interpretations that go beyond the classical theory. Note: This card was printed in the Arabian Nights set, a set completely inspired and designed around Arabian fantasy themes.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
With that said, the religious connotation of this card was not the reason it was banned. The same set also includes "Army of Allah", a card that would fit an identical narrative, which was not banned.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
The reasoning behind this banning is the white creature clause. The effect of both this card and the next, would be interpreted as 'White Supremacy' over every other color.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
6. Crusade (1993/2010) Crusade references the medieval religious wars of Christians and Muslims, between 1096 and 1271. Again, the religious connotations are not why the card has been banned, but rather the effect to only White Creatures.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
This effect could be interpreted as 'White Supremacy' and thus has been removed from the game. Note: Personally, as a person of color. This one....was a bit of a reach.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
None of the cards banned today were relevant in any major competitive formats as all of them weren't very good, and were already hard to come across due to age.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Magic The Gathering has always walked a fine line of incorporating religious and demonic elements in its cards. The game came under scrutiny in the early 1990s for its repeated use of pentagrams in the artwork of cards. Later removing them to appeal to a larger audience.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @Card_Kingdom
Today's bannings were a step in the right direction for making the game more inclusive. Large vendors like have completely taken cards like Invoke Prejudice off of their buylist/store.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
I hope this thread was valuable in educating yourself in today's decision. I found the research to be very interesting, particularly Stone Throwing Devils.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @KayleHatt
As pointed out by Both Jihad and Crusade were probably banned due the history of racial violence associated with both cards. We weren’t given the exact reasons for each card but I think this is closer rather than the color buff.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Forgot to paste one additional card. Imprison (1994) This card depicts a person with Black Skin being imprisoned, as a black person I find this image deeply disturbing as the same card could've been expressed in many other ways.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Following up to clarify because I misspoke. Both Jihad and Crusade were banned because their references blurred the lines of white’s color indentity in magic and white racially. Each are based on historical religious wars where people were murdered based on their religion.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Crusade being the Latin Christian perspective of recovering the holy land (Modern Day Israel) from the Muslims, and killing as many needed to accomplish this. In this case, white creatures getting +1/+1 is referencing Christian soldiers.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
Honor the pure is a functionally identical card (-1W) that does the same effect without any religious/racial references. Buffing a creature based on its color is not racist, doing so referencing historical racial/religious wars is.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
This interpretation of Jihad is the same time period from the Muslim perspective. Again the direct effect of buffing cards based on color is not racist, doing so referencing religious/racial war is.
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MerfolkMagic Jun 10
Replying to @MerfolkMagic
‘Army of Allah’ was not banned because it doesn’t apply effects based on color. Once again. Referencing religion or color is not the issue, blending them together is.
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