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Max Roser
Almost unbelievably fast progress here in Britain. Coal is disappearing rapidly. This visualization shows the daily share of Britain's electricity that is generated by coal. In 2012 still 40% was generated by burning coal. Now we go months without any.
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Max Roser Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
Here is the recent change in the context of the last century. Smil and others say that energy transitions are slow, but this doesn’t look slow to me. Britain was absolutely dominated by coal for generations. And now Britain got almost rid of it.
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Max Roser Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
40% of electricity was generated by coal back in 2012. In 2013 the country implemented the ‘carbon price floor’ (a top up carbon tax to the ETS). According to this study (chapter 4) this is what led to the unprecedented reduction in coal generation.
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Max Roser Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
Electricity generation is only a part of the energy sector and gas power plants still produce a lot of electricity. But the change in the electricity sector is surprisingly fast and the direction that the UK is taking is good.
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anti-deklinistische aktion Oct 7
Replying to @spycho @MaxCRoser
Coal is still used to make steel...
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Alexis Vernier Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
Such a quick evolution is poorly known, even among European countries !!!
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Elmar Veerman🪱 Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
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Mark Goodge 🎶 Oct 7
That mine is for metallurgical coal, which is (still) an essential raw material for steelmaking. It isn't for fuelling power stations. Not that you'd expect to comprehend the difference.
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Lyndon Rosser🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿🇪🇺 Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
We’re “lucky” that we’d invested nothing in our coal power stations since the sixties, so they were all completely uneconomic to update to meet EU pollution standards and had to close ASAP
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Robert Monfera Oct 7
Replying to @MaxCRoser
China, copy _that_, quick! (And Germany, Poland, Greece, Australia, Russia, India, ...)
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David Cox Oct 8
Replying to @monfera @MaxCRoser
Good to see that Germany's is finally decreasing - they use some of the dirtiest coal in the world and increased their coal burning after the Greens pushed them to stop using nuclear
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