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Max Roser
In the UK the number of cases rose rapidly. But the public – and authorities – are only learning this now because these cases were only published now as a backlog. The reason was apparently that the database is managed in Excel and the number of columns had reached the maximum.
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Max Roser Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
Here is the article Glad that they are apparently now working on a solution. Not one, but several Excel spreadsheets…
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Max Roser Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
It is now also the main headline at the BBC: At the end of last week confirmed cases were "actually nearer 11,000" – about 4,000 more than reported. This is very, very bad and also means that the outbreak is much more rapid than thought.
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Max Roser Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
Poorly managed is not just a huge problem in the COVID-19 pandemic – and helping to improve this situation is one of our main motivations to build
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Max Roser Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
The BBC has now published details on how the Excel screwup happened:
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Yael Moussaieff Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
There’s lots of counties that would have shoved those cases under the table forever rather than have the headlines. I know, I was born in one. It’s actually a weird credit to Britain that authorities have admitted them.
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Steven Reed Oct 5
Replying to @YJM_YJM @MaxCRoser
There's a weird notch in the graphs that would have been hard to explain otherwise. But I know what you mean..
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Tarun Varma Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
What's the best technical solution Max? How can the government manage this better?
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Dr David L Clements Oct 5
Replying to @tvarma @MaxCRoser
A database, FFS.
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Elisa Carboni Oct 5
Replying to @MaxCRoser
What? Excel? I can not believe this...
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Peter Magellan, proud Citizen of Nowhere Oct 5
Replying to @elisa_ox @MaxCRoser
I can.
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