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Matt Grossmann
Michigan State political scientist & director; fellow; contributor; New Book: Red State Blues
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Matt Grossmann 5m
the relationship between racial resentment & opposition to redistribution is weaker for lower income whites (who would benefit from redistribution) than for whites with higher incomes
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Matt Grossmann 7m
people gauge income through social comparison with similar others & are insensitive to large numbers at the top. subjective income is normally distributed, which may explain why many people who would benefit from redistribution oppose it
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Matt Grossmann 16m
local income inequality increases political participation, especially among the affluent.
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Matt Grossmann 18m
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Matt Grossmann retweeted
William Resh 2h
Two very different strains of scholarship, but... writes about USPS in "Bureaucracy on the Boundaries" has an experimental piece on public's implicit perceptions of performance between USPS and FedEx.
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Matt Grossmann retweeted
John D. Johnson 9h
Replying to @jdjmke
This article discusses the income X education interaction. In the past, the Dem base was low income/low education and the GOP base was high income/high education. Now the Dem base is low inc/high ed and the Rep base is high inc/low ed.
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Matt Grossmann retweeted
Josh McCrain 10h
Cool new paper from forthcoming PSRM: Causal evidence that government communications respond to changes in economic conditions and crime, using 110,000 city press releases
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Matt Grossmann 6h
I’m not hoping to work out all the causal order, just see whether broader views of several kinds (that are all more conservative than specific policy opinions) help explain why Dems are perceived more negatively when they move policy leftward (even if they make it more congruent)
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Matt Grossmann 8h
Core political values could be another angle, as they also could be important movers: & But do we measure people’s perceptions of the parties on values? Could be interesting design to see how changes with agenda
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Matt Grossmann 8h
I view it as a combination but I am interested in both the impact of ideological identification & separately or in combination the influence of broad views. Ideological distance just seems easier to find. Thanks for the papers.
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Matt Grossmann 10h
& I wouldn’t expect many consciously see party moving in their direction on policy & against on ideology. But there are many slightly conservative (or gov has too much power) voters with liberal policy views so you’d expect an accurate leftward reading on both to play differently
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Matt Grossmann 10h
Thanks. Would you expect the partisanship go ideological congruence path to be stronger than the partisanship to policy congruence path? I’d expect similar.
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Matt Grossmann 12h
Replying to @MattGrossmann
For example, voters might see health care & economic assistance moving left toward their issue-specific positions under Obama while also seeing party moving further away from them on broad role of government or ideology. And that might help account for backlash despite congruence
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Matt Grossmann 12h
Replying to @MattGrossmann
I am looking for designs that assess whether symbolic ideological perceptions (or broad views of government's role) move with issue-specific perceptions & whether they still matter independently (beyond showing that ideological self-identification still matters with issue scales)
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Matt Grossmann 12h
Anyone estimated citizen perceptions of parties' (or candidates') ideologies relative to self-identification (or differences in views of federal power / government role) independent of their issue-specific perceptions & views (& ideally vote effects)?
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Matt Grossmann retweeted
Ryan Burge 📊 13h
For all the talk of Trump losing support among certain religious groups (some from myself), the data from 2020 looks a lot like 2016. Exceptions: Trump's picked up support among Hispanic Catholics and Jews. But lost support among "nothing in particulars."
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Matt Grossmann 15h
Replying to @MattGrossmann
Convention likely to follow same pattern, recent event-focused attacks with policy laundry lists. Rather than push 1 highest priority like climate, left moved party’s ideal positions across issues. More stimulus & COVID-focused health might be default without clear prioritization
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Matt Grossmann 15h
Campaigns usually preview their priority for major legislation, as Obama did with stimulus & ACA. But Biden has been mostly negative & event responsive so far (now mostly focused on COVID & economy), so unclear how that would translate beyond whatever doesn’t pass from HEROES
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Matt Grossmann 24h
Mail vs in-person voting is becoming a partisan statement just as Michigan voters start getting used to their newish options. Possible that Trump undermining it with Republican voters could hurt party turnout or even fail to establish a habit of it for future elections
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Matt Grossmann Aug 13
Great poli sci Kamala takes from & & Biden & Harris show where the (still) Obama-era Democrats reside.
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