Twitter | Search | |
Martin Ravallion
Economist who strives to use ideas, data and analysis to help fight the scourge of global poverty. More at:
2,047
Tweets
321
Following
9,555
Followers
Tweets
Martin Ravallion retweeted
Dina D. Pomeranz 15h
The world’s poorest countries are paying some of the highest drug prices, with medicines costing up to 30 times more than in rich nations, according to a study from .
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 16
Replying to @MartinRavallion
We can carry this view into practical policy evaluation. Here is one example, on social protection in the developing world. Another is on the way, on food stamps and the poorest in US, where the floor has been falling. More work to do, but a start. (4/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 16
Replying to @MartinRavallion
Measurement practicalities require some averaging. And the floor is not all that matters, with possible trade-offs. But we should pay far more attention to what is happening at the floor. And let’s not kid ourselves that gains to only the super-rich have any positive weight.(3/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 16
Replying to @MartinRavallion
Instead I would judge a society’s economic progress by its success in raising the welfare of the least advantaged group (“maximin”)—lifting the floor. (The lexicographic version, “leximin,” says that if the worst off are equally well off, one looks to the next worst off.) (2/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 16
I have never been comfortable with the notion that there can be a gain to the richest person that justifies a loss to the poorest. So (like others) I don’t like classical utilitarianism, let alone its crass special case of maximizing GDP per capita. (1/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 16
Great vegetables! Kimberly Elliott's paper is exactly the sort of discussion of trade policy that we need. Past and present US policy could be more pro-poor, both globally or domestically.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 15
The incarceration rate in America is truly astonishing. "One in two adults has had an immediate family member incarcerated for at least one night in jail or prison." See link to full report. via
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 14
Very cool (sorry) time series graphs on causes of global warming.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 13
This claim about a "massively overstated growth rate" rests on shaky foundations IMO. It is based on predicted values from other data sources that can be widely off the mark in a rapidly changing economy.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 12
A careful observational study by Saravana Ravindran of the longer term impacts of a large ECD program in India. Evidence of negative spillover effects to other children. But still sizable impacts on various dimensions of welfare into adulthood.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 12
Not a god evaluation design. should have been consulted.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 12
Replying to @WorldBasicIncom
Some workers have very high incomes. Why should they not be taxed accordingly to help those less fortunate?
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 11
UBI advocates should not be opposed to (progressive) income taxes IMO, and that does not rule out taxes to mitigate external bads, like pollution. But financing is key. Then some of the strong positions taken in this debate fade from relevance.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 11
Large downward revision to India's GDP growth rates from . Note that this is based on predicted values from other data sources. In a rapidly changing economy the parameters can change too. It would be more convincing if we could isolate the methodological effect.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 9
Yes a UBI must be financed. Income tax makes sense when feasible (such as US). So not clear to me how one can be so opposed to UBI but so supportive of a negative income tax (or higher EITC in US). Pretty much the same thing. Another straw man on UBI here?
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 8
Replying to @BerkOzler12
My calculation assumes that it is additional and financed by taxes on nonpoor.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion retweeted
Dominique Jun 8
Replying to @N_Kabeer
Sorry you think so. I try to cite all relevant work in my papers, though blogs are another matter. Point of our post was to call out the continuing reliance on headship alone in gender-focused poverty analysis. I & others said this often at WB over 30 yrs. Old habits die hard.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 8
"This charity just canceled one of its poverty programs. That’s a good thing." via
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 7
‘I Can No Longer Continue to Live Here’ via
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Ravallion Jun 7
We have long known that the British Raj thoroughly exploited its colonies, but Utsa Patnaik's estimate of $45 trillion transfer from India to Britain is truly staggering. I have no reason to doubt it, but does anyone know of follow up research on this estimate?
Reply Retweet Like