Twitter | Search | |
Curiosity Rover
Your friendly neighborhood NASA Mars rover. Exploring the Red Planet since 2012. Team headquartered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory 🚀
3,659
Tweets
171
Following
4,004,153
Followers
Tweets
Curiosity Rover May 15
Replying to @Ohmsx @PhilLiggett
I'm not sure if I can get up out of my saddle, much less dance on the pedals, but that would certainly be motivation on this climb!
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 15
I don't do shout outs, but I do answer questions. Does she have a question about Mars? 🔴
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 15
Oh, the places we’ll go! Take a look at the parts of Mars I hope to explore soon. I hope my rover tracks may help lead the way for future humans on the Red Planet following their exploration at the Moon.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 1
Fellow explorer went to the north of Mars back in 2008 and discovered water ice just below the surface.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 1
Replying to @sribulletmama @NASAJPL
While a sol is a Martian day, it refers to the entire time it takes for the planet to turn once on its axis, not just the daylight period. Each 24 hour and 39 minute sol has daylight and nighttime.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 1
During the day, the sky on Mars is kind of a butterscotch hue. Sunrises and sunsets are blue here because of the way fine dust scatters light.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 1
Sure thing. Here's a time lapse of sunset on Mars, courtesy Opportunity.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover May 1
InSight takes pics And I do, too Mars is red But its sunsets are blue We bots have been imaging sunrise and sunsets on Mars since the '70s. Check out this moment to see shots from Viking, Pathfinder, Spirit, Opportunity, and me.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 25
This clay unit is so delicious, I went back for seconds. Planning science analysis for dessert.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 23
Replying to @gewalker @NASAInSight
The team plans to add the uncompressed audio to
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 23
Replying to @escapecar @NASAInSight
It don't mean nothin'. But this seismic event is really interesting! Find out more:
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 23
Stop what you're doin'. I'm about to ruin the image and the style that you're used to: detected what is likely a marsquake. Seismic sound laid down by the underground can be heard here between Martian wind and vibrations from InSight's arm.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 18
Grind & Stack Back at , the back shell, descent stage, test rover and heat shield have been assembled and stacked for testing as the mission's July 2020 launch date inches closer.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 11
Replying to @Baby_Giraffe65
Two stills -- one before, one after.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 11
Replying to @Saintb0ss
It was taken from my Mastcam, which is about 2 meters (roughly 6.5 feet) above the surface. The drill hole itself is ~1.6 cm (0.63 inches) wide.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 11
Did I do that? 🤓 This rock was so soft, I didn't need to use percussion, making it the first sample obtained with drill rotation alone. This gif of "Aberlady" shows that it and surrounding rocks appear to have moved when the bit was retracted.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 10
It's not a hot doughnut or the Eye of Sauron. This is the first image ever of a black hole. Supermassive congratulations to the whole team. What can be accomplished by people and telescopes around the world working together is truly awesome.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 8
Never. I've got some amazing rover tracks to follow. Sojourner went with Pathfinder to Mars in 1997. landed in 2004. For a size comparison, here is a flight spare of Sojourner with the real Spirt and Opportunity before their launches.
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 8
Don’t let your dreams be dreams. Back in 2011, before I launched for , Gale Crater was chosen as my landing site in part because of intriguing clays seen from orbit. I finally got beneath the surface of those clays. Science to come
Reply Retweet Like
Curiosity Rover Apr 5
This rover’s got MOXIE. (I love moxie.) Future explorers: this might be a key step in helping you breathe easy on Mars. This tech demo, recently installed on at , aims to extract oxygen from the Martian atmosphere.
Reply Retweet Like