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Market Urbanism
Tweets by / smithsj@gmail.com
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Market Urbanism retweeted
Alasdair Rae 22h
Here's the final version of the global population density graphic I made, because another one that is circulating was less well defined, and someone cropped NZ off it
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Market Urbanism 11h
I didn't know anything about that in the 2000s, I just thought Paris had bad air quality because the air was spicy
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Market Urbanism retweeted
Lior Steinberg Nov 28
IKEA Germany rents out e-cargo bikes to customers, making it easier to brings things home. IKEA in the Netherlands has been doing this for years with regular cargo bikes. I've delivered my entire interior in Groningen using these bikes.
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Market Urbanism 21h
I can’t believe only two LA CMs would sign on to a proposal to make housing much more expensive to build
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Market Urbanism 23h
Replying to @DrCameronMurray
Not coincidentally, those three innermost wards are essentially the only part of Japan with binding zoning constraints, due to Japan’s general aversion to skyscrapers. If you look at actual Tokyo-wide prices, the story is in line with what you’re trying to disprove:
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Market Urbanism 23h
Replying to @geographyjim
My understanding of Japanese planning is that the very center of Tokyo is basically the only place where there are binding supply constraints
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Market Urbanism 23h
Replying to @geographyjim
He also used a chart of second-hand apartments in the three innermost wards and misrepresented it as “Tokyo prices”
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Market Urbanism 23h
Replying to @DrCameronMurray
That’s a chart of prices for second-hand condo in the three innermost wards, not “Tokyo prices”
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Market Urbanism Nov 28
Replying to @416_Perp
Yes that
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Market Urbanism Nov 28
Replying to @416_Perp
The fastest way to bring down hard costs (and even a few soft costs) is to zone for more low-rise development
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
At least that's my intuition. I do see though, surprisingly, Black share of Lower Merion grew from 2000 to 2010. idk if that means it is desegregating because the Black pop'n is growing in the richer areas, or if it's growing in the other Black segregated n'hood (South Ardmore)
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
I'd say it's becoming resegregated in a different way. Less segregated would mean Black people moving to Irish streets and vice-versa, upper-middle class moving in but Irish/Black people moving out to the richer n'hoods north of the tracks. But that's not happening I don't think
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
That would be optimistic framing. The people being displaced aren't moving to rich neighborhoods north of the tracks though; longtime Black and working-class white enclaves in a generally rich and white school district are becoming richer and whiter (my parents were part of that)
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
They did! I guess still do, or will pretty soon hopefully. When I was younger though it was more "popular," let's call it
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
Now the "Bryn Mawr Film Institute"! This woman in a wheelchair turned it into a nonprofit and made it kinda upscale actually. Caters to an veeeeery geriatric crowd
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
On South Merion and Prospect Ave. there were two different Black churches. In retrospect, kinda wild that that small of a community supported two churches
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
What is now labeled "Danley Townhomes" were low lot coverage apartments, mostly inhabited by South Asian medical residents and their families. Since redeveloped as expensive (by PA standards...maybe $600k?) townhouses
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
Pink X is dad's house, purple X was mom's (half of semi). Blue streets were WWC (Irish), green streets were Black, orange streets were gentrified upper-middle class, yellow streets were institutional (college kids, halfway houses). I think now it's basically all gentrifying
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Market Urbanism Nov 27
In retrospect, segregated in minute detail! We lived in the most urban part, south of the train tracks (north was large lot rich)
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