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Margret Geraghty
Author, psychologist, story analyst. Latest book: More Five-Minute Writing. Loves horses, apple pie & psychology of narrative. Rep'd by Jane Judd Lit. Agency
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Margret Geraghty Oct 27
Could you write a story - or just a freewrite - using this picture as inspiration? Why not give it a go. eggHDR3010 by The-Egg
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Margret Geraghty Oct 27
I hear that Microsoft is developing a 'smart' tablecloth. You place some ingredients on top and it suggests recipes for meals (via an app). Hmm. Will it know the difference between a can of peaches and one of tomatoes? Could make for some interesting suppers.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 27
Replying to @wurdsmyth
I find that fiction with a recognisable structure is important for boosting my mood, something with a proper ending in which loose threads are tied. Agatha Christie-type crime is perfect but also P G Wodehouse for the humour and metaphors.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 26
Interested to hear that Malika Booker, whose poem The Little Miracles won The Forward prize for year’s best poem, was partly inspired by Tomas Transtromer’s A Winter Night. Booker wrote out T’s poem and circled words - echoes, nails, constellations - that struck a chord.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 26
Replying to @LizzieKemball
Hope the research goes well, Elizabeth. Certainly sounds interesting.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 26
'The power of Shakespeare’s plays is that they take something ordinary and transform it into something extraordinary. Themes of love, passion, ambition, revenge, hatred, despair, desire, and family dysfunction make his work relatable . . . .' via
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Margret Geraghty Oct 26
Replying to @LizzieKemball
'Look, where he comes! Not poppy, nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world, Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep Which thou ow'dst yesterday.' Iago, referrring to Othello.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Replying to @JenniAuthor
We’ve seen all the episodes twice. A beautifully-crafted series. Love the way the threads pull together.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Debs, many thanks for retweeting my ‘sound’ piece.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Many thanks for retweeting my 'sounds' prompt.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Replying to @MargretGeraghty
More sounds: a gunshot, rain dripping from a gutter, the crackle of logs, a street busker, the wail of a siren, a pneumatic drill, children in a playground, tyres on gravel, the howl of a wolf, the clatter of horses' hooves, the screech of an owl, the clink of wineglasses . . .
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
It is indeed, Lucy. I love it. Still the best version.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Thanks for retweeting, Maggie.😀
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Almost anything can spark a piece of fiction. Take 'sound'. Could be footsteps, church bells, the crash of waves against a sea wall, or something more quirky like Orwell's clocks striking 13 in 1984. Sound can be natural, industrial, pleasant, scary. Try making your own list.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 24
Jamaica Inn was the first DdM I read and I loved it. I think when you read a book first you have your own image of the characters and it rarely matches that of the film director.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 23
Doctors used to think that nostalgia was a psychopathological disorder. Not any more: The surprising way nostalgia can help us cope with the pandemic via
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Margret Geraghty Oct 23
Replying to @CarolBevitt
The old ones from my childhood are now collectors' items. I saw some on ebay for around £20. Fancy that - as my mother might have said.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 23
I love both. Madding Crowd has sad elements but it’s more upbeat. If you like old films, the 1967 version with Julie Christie, Terence Stamp and Alan Bates is excellent.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 23
Replying to @foreverantrim
Interesting piece. Sounds as though he was a bit of a prickly person - Stephen Joyce, I mean - but I guess it was driven by loyality to his grandfather and I have sympathy with that.
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Margret Geraghty Oct 23
Replying to @foreverantrim
Many people - including readers - questioned the missing apostrophe but he wouldn't have it. And since it was his magazine it stayed Writers News.
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