Twitter | Search | |
Marcus Skov
Missed out on the last one, so for this year’s I wanted to highlight colourblindness and how to better tailor game UI for it with a couple of tips, tricks and examples Thread (1/4)
Reply Retweet Like More
Marcus Skov May 21
Replying to @MarcusSkov
When displaying two opposing teams and only colours can be used to tell them apart, aim for ones that sit opposite one another on the colour spectrum. Orange and blue being the two most distinguishable options when accommodating for the most common colourblindness types. (2/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Marcus Skov May 21
Replying to @MarcusSkov
When working with a variety of different colour states for similar elements it’s worth considering using icons and/or patterns as a way of indicating what each state mean. Can have the added effect of strengthen the intent for non-colourblind users too; win-win. (3/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Marcus Skov May 21
Replying to @MarcusSkov
There’s no single or simple answer when optimising UIs for colourblindness as it’s always a case-by-case thing based on feature requirements. Looking for ways to confirm whether a solution will work and use best judgement is always a solid approach at the end of the day. (4/4)
Reply Retweet Like
Emil X May 21
Replying to @MarcusSkov
What are your thoughts on stark vs color oracle as a plug-in?
Reply Retweet Like
Marcus Skov May 21
Replying to @TheEmilX
Personally, I really like color oracle. Mainly because it’s available to people who don’t have a specific design program and is very easy to use. Stark has more features, some being really useful as well, but it’s not as quick of a way to check for colour issues
Reply Retweet Like
Pablo Orezzoli May 22
Can’t believe this. Never read UI tips for people like me (Deuter) and all my life played games not even thinking about it but every now and then confused about teams in a map , had to zoom in and read the city name. Thank you!!!
Reply Retweet Like
Marcus Skov May 22
It’s historically a fairly under-utilised concept to consider during development, at least where UI is concerned, but thankfully been gaining more popularity lately, which is great!
Reply Retweet Like
Steven Stadnicki May 21
Replying to @MarcusSkov
This is awesome, thank you so much! Any thoughts or suggestions on how to do heatmaps in colourblind-friendly fashion?
Reply Retweet Like
Marcus Skov May 22
Replying to @shaterri
It depends a lot on what the heatmap is meant to show. If it's just a postive/negative view then using blue and red/orange colours, along with a descriptive legend, would do the job nicely. Icons floating above specific objects that describe their state is even better.
Reply Retweet Like
Ayrton May 23
Replying to @MarcusSkov
this is really helpful, do you have any goto programs i can jump too to preview assets in these colour modes?
Reply Retweet Like
Marcus Skov May 23
Replying to @Ayrton_GD
Color Oracle or Sim Daltonism are two open source applications that I can recommend. Both basically covert your entire screen to whatever colour mode you choose so they work everywhere I use Color Oracle myself as it is ever so slightly more colour accurate than Sim
Reply Retweet Like