Twitter | Search | |
This is the legacy version of twitter.com. We will be shutting it down on 15 December 2020. Please switch to a supported browser or device. You can see a list of supported browsers in our Help Center.
MBARI
The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute: Advancing marine science and engineering to understand our changing ocean.
22,226
Tweets
1,759
Following
33,185
Followers
Tweets
MBARI 1h
Biting off more than you can chew—the official motto of deep-sea animals everywhere. ⁠ ⁠ Spending ? Dive into our YouTube channel. You'll be amazed by the wonders of :
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI 14h
Yes, dumbo ocotpuses (Grimpoteuthis sp.) and flapjacks (Opisthoteuthis sp) are both in the family Opisthoteuthidae:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI retweeted
ECO Magazine 21h
The largest aggregation of fishes ever recorded in the abyssal deep sea has been discovered by a team of oceanographers from & Discover more here:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI 22h
An underwater heat blob from the Atlantic is delivering more and more warmth to the Arctic, causing sea ice to rapidly melt:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI 23h
Replying to @MontereyAq
Happy thanksgiving from the deep sea!
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 25
This underwater glider was equipped with sensors to measure seasonal changes in ocean properties, including pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and other parameters crucial to understanding local carbonate chemistry:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 25
Replying to @MBARI_News
Explore more of our favorite deep-sea animals on MBARI's page:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 25
The flapjack octopus is often spotted resting on the mud, resembling a flat, fluffy, orange pancake. When startled, the flapjack perks up and swims to safety by flapping its fins, pulsing its webbed arms, jetting water through its funnel—or all 3 at once!
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 24
RT : We're ! Apply to join our team as a Manager bringing insight ➡️ impact toward solutions.
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI retweeted
Vic DeLeon #BLM Nov 23
I know it’s only Monday but things are suddenly looking good so have this GIANT Weird Fish thread via
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI retweeted
University of Hawaii at Manoa Nov 24
🔍 : The largest aggregation of fishes ever recorded in the abyssal deep-sea was discovered by a team of oceanographers from , and ➡️
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 24
A new study suggests that dead fish, chocked full of a lifetime of mercury, may be a primary means by which toxic mercury is delivered to the deep ocean:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 24
Research Offers New Insight on the Role Kelp Can Play in Fighting Ocean Acidification:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 24
Measuring carbon export throughout the year traditionally requires persistent ship-based observations, which can be costly and perilous for researchers. These measurements can now be made remotely using autonomous biogeochemical profiling floats.
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 24
Climate change is sending some species the wrong way. Not every animal has the power to migrate to cooler climes:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 23
Litter on the seafloor is the least investigated fraction of marine litter, which is not surprising as much of it lies in the deep sea, i.e. the least explored ecosystem.
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI retweeted
Astrid Leitner Nov 23
Check out this video taken of the largest aggregation of in the abyssal deep sea! Taken at the top of a previously unexplored unnamed seamount in the equatorial Pacific! Read the full article at:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 23
Join MBARI scientist John Ryan in this Whalefest Monterey collaboration with composer Nickolas Fettis on Dec 1 at 7 pm. This event is sure to be an amazing journey into the art and science of whale song:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 23
Replying to @AstridBLeitner
“Our findings highlight how much there is still left to discover in the deep sea, and how much we might lose if we do not manage deep-sea mining appropriately.” - Read the paper here:
Reply Retweet Like
MBARI Nov 23
In research led by , an MBARI postdoc, cutthroat eels, Ilyophis arx, were observed swarming around bait deployed on a lander on the summit of a seamount in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone. Video courtesy of the Deep Sea Fish Ecology Lab, U of Hawaii.
Reply Retweet Like