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Lucy Worsley
I am unutterably delighted to learn that when a Portuguese person wants to express the thought ‘a bad workman blames his tools,’ she says instead that ‘A BAD DANCER BLAMES HIS TROUSERS.’
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Gemma Thompson Jan 26
Replying to @Lucy_Worsley
My face is the German version of ‘fits like a glove’.. das passt wie ars auf eimer (THAT FITS LIKE AN ARSE ON A BUCKET!) 😅❤️
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生まれつき茶色い神 Jan 26
There's also "Passt wie die Faust auf's Auge" ("fits like the fist onto the eye").
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Ben Jones Jan 26
Replying to @Lucy_Worsley
Which part of Portugal were you informed they use this phrase? Been with a Portuguese lady for 26 years now & never once heard this phrase used by her or any of my extended Portuguese family. 🤔
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Katia Yaga🗽 Jan 26
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Marnie Marie Jan 26
Replying to @Lucy_Worsley
In German it's the beautifully specific "Wenn der Bauer nicht schwimmen kann ist die Badehose Schuld" - translation: "If the farmer can't swim he blames his swimming trunks"
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Rob Leduc 🆘 Jan 26
Replying to @Lucy_Worsley
I’ve been studying Portuguese a couple of years. When they ask me if it’s hard to study their language, I reply with their version of “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks”. Literally, “Um burro velho não aprende línguas”, translates as “an old donkey doesn’t learn languages.”
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AnnetteVitelli Jan 27
It’s hard to learn, unlike Spanish and Italian it’s not as soft. Portuguese people are beautiful
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🄿🅁🄴🅃🅃🅈 🄷🄰🅃 🄼🄰🄲🄷🄸🄽🄴 ⚫️ Jan 27
Am reminded of the (I think) Polish phrase for disowning a situation “not my monkey; not my circus”.
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